Research

The Urban Struggle for Economic, Environmental, and Social Justice

Malo André Hutson, Assistant Professor of City & Regional Planning; Assoc. Director of IURD

Project Description

Newly published research entitled: The Urban Struggle for Economic, Environmental, and Social Justice: Deepening Their Roots, which explores how coalitions of residents, community leaders, unions, and others are trying to resist displacement as a result of neighborhood change and transform their communities to sustainable healthy communities (defined as economically strong, environmentally clean, and socially just communities). The book is  part of Routledge’s Equity, Justice, and the Sustainable City series.

The book discusses the current demographic shifts of blacks, Latinos, and other people of colour out of certain strong-market cities and the growing fear of displacement among low-income urban residents. It documents these populations’ efforts to remain in their communities and highlights how this leads to community organizing around economic, environmental, and social justice. The book shows how residents of once-neglected urban communities are standing up to city economic development agencies, influential real estate developers, universities, and others to remain in their neighbourhoods, protect their interests, and transform their communities into sustainable, healthy communities. These communities are deploying new strategies that build off of past struggles over urban renewal. Based on seven years of research, this book draws on a wealth of material to conduct a case study analysis of eight low-income/mixed-income communities in Boston, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, DC.

This timely book is aimed at researchers and postgraduate students interested in urban policy and politics, community development, urban studies, environmental justice, urban public health, sociology, community-based research methods, and urban planning theory and practice. It will also be of interest to policy makers, community activists, and the private sector.

About the Routledge Series:

“The series introduces critical perspectives and new approaches to the practice and theory of urban planning and policy that ask how the world's cities can become ‘greener’ while becoming more fair, equitable and just.  Routledge Equity,  Justice and the Sustainable City series addresses sustainable city trends in the global North and South and investigates them for their potential to ensure a transition to urban sustainability that is equitable and just for all. These trends include municipal climate action plans; resource scarcity as tipping points into a vortex of urban dysfunction; inclusive urbanization; "complete streets" as a tool for realizing more "livable cities"; the use of information and analytics toward the creation of "smart cities".