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Faculty Support

Faculty support in the form of endowed chairs, faculty excellence funds, and research project resources are necessary in order to keep pace with new ideas, research, technologies, questions, and potential practices. CED is working to increase its number of endowed chairs, build financial support for emerging and established talent to serve as visiting professors, and provide funding for research.

Current Endowments


College of Environmental Design

The William W. Wurster Chair

An endowment used to benefit the College of Environmental Design. The chair will be reserved for the current dean of the college and is used to support the teaching, research and public service activities of the college and its faculty. Currently, the William W. Wurster Chair  is held by Dean Jennifer Wolch.

The Arcus Chair in Gender, Sexuality and The Built Environment

The College of Environmental Design received generous funding from the Arcus Foundation that was matched by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The endowment supports a wide range of critical and creative activities at the intersection of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) issues and to introduce new generations of students to a practice of environmental design that respects difference, challenges hetero-normative assumptions, and confronts injustice and inequity in the making of buildings, communities, and metropolitan regions. Currently the  Arcus  Chair  is  held  by Professor of  Archtecture Greig  Crysler.

The David K. Woo Chair in the College of Environmental Design

This endowment was part of a major gift given by David Woo to UC Berkeley in 2011 to honor his late father, Woo Hon Fai, who was the founding chairman of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, president of the Gold and Silver Exchange Society of Hong Kong, deputy chairman of the Hong Kong Commodity Exchange and vice chairman of the Hong Kong Real Estate Association. The Chair supports the work of an eminent faculty member in CED, and is currently held by Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design, Walter J. Hood.

The Robert J. and Millicent C. Lalanne Chair in Real Estate Development, Architecture and Urbanism

Bob and Millicent have recently made a generous pledge of $1 million, matched by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, for the creation of the Robert J. and Millicent C. Lalanne Chair in Real Estate Development, Architecture and Urbanism.  Housed in the Department of Architecture, and encouraged to be jointly appointed with the Department of City and Regional Planning, the Lalanne Chair supports a chair holder that will lead research, case studies and instructional programs that span the cycle of thoughtful and responsible real estate development, architecture, urban design and planning, and leadership skills required for successful intervention in the built environment. The chair serves as a bridge to the fields within the College of Environmental Design as well as other UC Berkeley schools and colleges, in particular the Haas School of Business and its real estate program, the Goldman School of Public Policy, the College of Engineering and the Berkeley School of Law. Currenly  the  Lalanne Chair  is  held  by Professor of  Archtecture, Chris  Calott.

The I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professorship in Affordable Housing and Urban Policy

The I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professorship in Affordable Housing and Urban Policy was established in 1998 with an endowment funded by individual and corporate gifts in memory of I. Donald Terner. The chair is held jointly by the Haas School of Business and the College of Environmental Design and encourages the study of affordable housing and seeks to further strengthen the Real Estate Program at U.C. Berkeley. The late Don Terner set an extraordinary example of integrity, activism, and innovation in the real estate and urban economics field, therefore to commemorate his innovative spirit, the endowment shall be used to recruit and retain exceptional scholars and practitioners and provide stable funding to establish a program of national prominence in affordable housing at CED. Recently the chair has been awarded to adjunct professor of City and Regional Planning, Carol Galante.

The Sam Davis Social Practice Fund

Sam Davis, F.A.I.A., is Principal of Sam Davis Architecture and has been on the faculty at UC Berkeley since 1971. A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, he has served as President of the AIA East Bay and on the Board of Directors of AIACC. His professional work, mostly in California, is focused on affordable housing, housing for those with special needs, and facilities for the homeless.

The Sam Davis Social Practice Fund provides support for faculty and students in all departments of the College of Environmental Design who focus on social aspects and implications of design with topics such as affordable housing, supportive housing, and equity issues in design. Funds will be used for conferences and symposia, faculty research-particularly junior faculty, Graduate student (MA, MS, PhD) research and thesis, student support for internships in non-profit housing or service organizations, as well as course support.

The Jeffrey and Helen Chan Faculty Excellence Fund

The Jeffery and Helen Chan Faculty Excellence Fund supports the development of the College of Environmental Design's teaching, research, and service mission. The fund is used to provide financial incentives to recruit and retain preeminent faculty in the College of Environmental Design so that the college may effectively compete with other top universities for outstanding professors in the face of widening funding disparities between public research universities and private institutions.

The Charles W. Moore Endowment for the Study of Place

The Charles W. Moore Endowment is used to support programs involving students and faculty that address humanistic values as a basis for place making, learning archetypal principles from the history of many cultures, and from the close study of existing places. Programs must be fresh and adventurous and will involve the participating students and faculty traveling together to study and design for exemplary places, then to collaborate in the preparation of documents, exhibitions or special events that make those studies available to the public.

The Mountain Hut Design Competition Project

This  fund  was created by San Francisco attorney Jay Wiener who established the Wiener Family Fund to continue a commitment to progressive modern architecture that was initiated by his family. His family includes Samuel G. Wiener and his cousin William B. Wiener, early regional masters of architecture in the United States.

The Catherine Bauer Wurster Memorial Fund
Catherine Bauer Wurster, the spouse of the dean of CED in the 1950’s,>William W. Wurster, was also a nationally known housing expert and later professor of city and regional planning.  Bauer Wurster was also an authority in housing and a leader in New Deal housing policy as well as a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Environmental Design. The Catherine Bauer Wurster Memorial Fund is used for annual Catherine Bauer Wurster Memorial Lecture at the College of Environmental Design.

Architecture

The Eva Li Memorial Chair in Architecture

The Eva Li Memorial Chair will provide funding for the teaching, research, and creative activities of faculty in the Department of Architecture. The chair was established in 1998 through the generosity of Annie Li, who received an M.S. in agricultural economics from Berkeley in 1942. Currently the Eva Li Memorial Chair is held by professor in Architecture Ronald Rael, Associate Professor of Architecture.

The Berkeley-Rupp Architecture Professorship and Prize

Sigrid Lorenz Rupp was a Palo Alto-based architect. Her fascination with architecture dated back to her childhood in postwar Germany where she witnessed an intensive building boom under way. She later studied architecture at the UC Berkeley, where she was mentored by Joseph Esherick, Harold Stump, and Donald Reay. After graduation, she went on to work for several Bay Area firms, eventually founding her own firm, SLR Architects. Ms. Rupp believed that practitioners would benefit greatly from an opportunity to engage in creative and scholarly work away from traditional practice, research and/or teaching. Ms. Rupp was a champion of women’s rights in the profession of architecture, and was a mentor to many women and minorities wanting to succeed in the field. She believed that women bring special values to architecture that emphasize a “triple-bottom-line,” which includes economic, environmental, and social approaches to design and a commitment to sustainability and the community.

The Berkeley-Rupp Architecture Professorship and Prize awards a monetary gift biannually to a distinguished practitioner or academic who has made a significant contribution to promoting the advancement of women in the field of architecture, and whose work emphasizes a commitment to sustainability and the community. This unique opportunity provides recipients with the chance to engage in creative scholarly pursuits during a semester-long professorship at the College of Environmental Design.  Internationally recognized architect Sheila Kennedy is currently the 2014 Prize recipient.

The Howard A. Friedman Visiting Professorship Fund

Howard A. Friedman graduated in 1949 from Cal with an architecture degree and later went on to help shape the physical environment of the San Francisco Bay Area, and other regions, becoming one of America's most thoughtful and interesting architects. The Howard A.Friedman Visiting Professorship Fund was established by Phyllis Koshland Friedman '44, Social Welfare & M.S.W. '71, and widow of Professor Friedman. The professorship advances Professor Friedman's philosophy of ''humanistic architecture'' and the interweaving of such disparate factors as design, function, technology, time, funding, and social responsibility. This endowment will be used to support a visiting professor, who is a distinguished practitioner in the field of architecture, to lecture at the College of Environmental Design.

The Joseph Esherick Endowed Professorship

This endowment is used to support a visiting professor in architecture with a focus of the melding of technology and design in the College of Environmental Design.

The Joseph Esherick Endowed Fund was established in 1996 with gifts from John B. Rutherford, Rutherford & Chekene, David M. Leaf, and Eugene Lorincz in honor of Professor Emeritus Joseph Esherick, a well-known Bay Area architect and professor in the Department of Architecture at Cal. In 2005, it became the Joseph Esherick Endowed Professorship to support a visiting professor in architecture with a focus of the melding of technology and design.

Joan E. Draper Architectural History Research Endowment Fund

Joan E. Draper earned an A.B. in Architecture (1968), a Master of Architecture (1972), and a Ph.D. in Architecture (1979), all from UC Berkeley. Dr. Draper later went on to teach at multiple universities, specializing in the history of American architecture and urban planning. Draper was additionally a founding member of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History.

The Joan E. Draper Architectural History Research Endowment Fund is used to support the teaching, research, and creative activities of emerging faculty, scholars, and staff in CED regarding areas of architectural and urban history and the conservation of historical records and images.

The Doris and Clarence Malo Collegium Teaching Chair
The Malo Collegium Chair was established through a bequest from Doris P. and Clarence A. Malo, matched by a gift from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Doris Malo was a Cal alumna, who received her B.A. in Decorative Arts in 1943 from the Department of Decorative Arts in the College of Letters and Science, later renamed the Department of Design when it moved to the College of Environmental Design. The Berkeley Collegium is a newly-established group of endowed chairs held by some of the university's most talented faculty, who are devoted to excellence in teaching, particularly at the undergraduate level. The Malo Collegium Chair focuses on a broad range of design-related areas, including politics and design; design and everyday life; the fine arts and design; studio-based design and practice; and design and fabrication. The chair is currently held by Professor of Architecture, Lisa Iwamoto.
The Horst W.J. Rittel Endowment

Horst Rittel was recruited to Berkeley in 1963 by William Wurster. Together with Christopher Alexander, Bruce Archer, and John Chris Jones, Horst Rittel helped found the Design Methods Movement. He taught design methods courses at both Ulm and Berkeley, helped found the Design Methods Group (DMG) at Berkeley, and the DMG Journal.

The Horst W.J. Rittel Endowment supports activities involved with instruction in the field of Design Theories and Methods, of which might include symposia, guest speakers, or student- initiated projects in the Department of Architecture in the College of Environmental Design.

The William and Jennifer Fain Urban Design Endowment

William Fain is an architect and urban designer with an international reputation and a long list of professional honors. He received his B.A. in Architecture from Berkeley and his M.Arch in Urban Design degree from Harvard. Fain is also the managing partner and directs master planning and urban design for Johnson Fain headquartered in downtown Los Angeles. With extensive experience in urban design, community planning, downtown redevelopment and transit-oriented development, his career has focused on advancing the practice of urban design as a bridge between the public good and private benefit.

The William and Jennifer Fain Urban Design Endowment supports studies in urban design in the Department of Architecture at CED. A Grant is given annually and is open to any enrolled student or faculty member in the Department of Architecture.


Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning

The Beatrix C. Farrand Distinguished Professorship in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

Beatrix Cadwalader Jones Farrand (1872-1959) was the first prominent American woman in landscape architecture and bequeathed her large estate to Berkeley in 1955, of which included the Reef Point Gardens Library; her private and business papers and correspondence; and, an endowment for landscape architecture library collections.

The purpose of the endowment is to augment the teaching, research and creative activities of faculty and will be used for graduate student, staff, program support, and support for visiting lecturers, publication funds, and other uses allowed by the University. Currently, the professorship is held by Visiting Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning, Philip Williams.

The Sara B. Child Landscape Design Fund
The Sara B. Child Landscape Design Fund is used by CED to support the teaching of landscape design.
The Geraldine Knight Scott Landscape Architecture Fund
Geraldine Knight Scott obtained degree in Landscape Architecture in 1926 then later went on to earn degrees in art and architecture from Cornell University. A strong advocate of travel as a means to increase one’s self-knowledge and appreciation of other cultures, Knight spent twenty-two months in Europe beginning in 1930. She surveyed historic Italian villas through the Academia Della Arts in Rome and explored the famous gardens of France and Spain, also attending the Sorbonne in Paris, where she pursued an interest in housing, studying projects in Germany and Austria. The Geraldine Knight Scott Landscape Architecture Fund supports graduate traveling fellowships in the Department of Landscape Architecture or any successor department within CED. This annual fellowship allows the recipient to undertake a program of travel and study under the guidance of the Department of Landscape Architecture.

Department of City and Regional Planning

The Carmel P. Friesen Chair in Urban Studies

This chair was endowed by a gift from alums Carmel P. and Howard R. Friesen, matched by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The endowment is used to support the Department of City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design with a specific preference for the field of Urban Studies. Currently the chair is held by Professor of City and Regional Planning, Karen Chapple.

The Theodore B. and Doris Shoong Lee Chair in Real Estate Law and Urban Planning

Ted and Doris Lee endowed the Theodore B. and Doris Shoong Lee Distinguished Professorship in Real Estate Law and Urban Planning, to foster interdisciplinary collaboration between CED and Berkeley Law. The goal of the Professorship is to support the work of a distinguished Visiting Professor who is a practitioner to teach one graduate course per year with a focus on the intersection of real estate, urban planning, and land use/environmental law. The interdisciplinary learning opportunities provided by the Professorship stimulate new veins of intellectual thought necessary for addressing today's complex urban development issues.

The Robert S. Cornish Endowed Chair in Regional Planning

The estate of Robert “Bob” Cornish (B.A. Arch. '51; M.C.P. ' 64) endowed the Robert S. Cornish Endowed Chair in Regional Planning provides to provide for a visiting professorship in regional planning with a distinguished background in practice, who demonstrates a clear and continuing interest in the area of integrated regional planning.

In addition the Robert S. Cornish Endowed Fund in Regional Planning  supports teaching, research, and public service activities associated with the Robert S. Cornish Endowed Chair in Regional Planning.