UC Berkeley
College of Environmental Design

2012-2011

Faculty Publications

Women in Landscape Architecture: Essays on History and Practice
Edited By: Louise A. Mozingo and Linda Jewell
McFarland (2012)

While many fields struggle to specify feminine contributions, the work of women has always played a fundamental role in American landscape architecture. Women claim responsibility for many landscape types now taken for granted, including community gardens, playgrounds, and streetscapes. This collection of essays by leaders in the discipline addresses the ways that gender has influenced the history, design practice and perception of landscapes. It highlights women’s relation to landscape architecture, presents the professional efforts of women in the landscape realm, examines both the perception and experience of landscapes by women, and speculates on ways to re-imagine gender and the landscape.


Toward a Minor Architecture
By: Jill Stoner
The MIT Press (2012)

Architecture can no longer limit itself to the art of making buildings; it must also invent the politics of taking them apart. This is Jill Stoner's premise for a minor architecture. Her architect's eye tracks differently from most, drawn not to the lauded and iconic but to what she calls 'the landscape of our constructed mistakes' — metropolitan hinterlands rife with failed and foreclosed developments, undersubscribed office parks, chain hotels, and abandoned malls. These graveyards of capital, Stoner asserts, may be stripped of their excess and become sites of strategic spatial operations. But first we must dissect and dismantle prevalent architectural mythologies that brought them into being — western obsessions with interiority, with the autonomy of the building-object, with the architect's mantle of celebrity, and with the idea of nature as that which is 'other' than the built metropolis. These four myths form the warp of the book. 


 

Cairo: Histories of a City
By: Nezar AlSayyad
Harvard University Press (2011)

From its earliest days as a royal settlement fronting the pyramids of Giza to its current manifestation as the largest metropolis in Africa, Cairo has forever captured the urban pulse of the Middle East. In twelve vignettes, accompanied by drawings, photographs, and maps, AlSayyad details the shifts in Cairo’s built environment through stories of important figures who marked the cityscape with their personal ambitions and their political ideologies. The city is visually reconstructed and brought to life not only as a physical fabric but also as a social and political order—a city built within, upon, and over, resulting in a present-day richly layered urban environment.


 

The Fundamentalist City? : Religiosity and the Remaking of Urban Space
By: Nezar AlSayyad and Mejgan Massoumi
Routledge (2011)

The relationship between urbanism and fundamentalism is a very complex one. This book explores how the dynamics of different forms of religious fundamentalisms are produced, represented, and practiced in the city. It attempts to establish a relationship between two important phenomena: the historic transition of the majority of the world’s population from a rural to an urban existence; and the robust resurgence of religion as a major force in the shaping of contemporary life in many parts of the world. The contributors to this focus on how certain ultra religious practices of Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism have contributed to the remaking of global urban space. Their work suggests that it is a grave oversimplification to view religious orthodoxies or doctrines as the main cause of urban terrorism or violence.


 

Democracy is Not a Spectator Sport: the Ultimate Volunteer Handbook
By: Arthur Blaustein with Helen Matatov
Skyhorse Publishing (2011)

Democracy is not a spectator sport! Learn how to get in the game with this comprehensive collection of more than two hundred community service opportunities and experiences. More than a simple resource guide, this unique handbook includes interviews, anecdotes, and commentary from the top folks in nonprofit and service fields and ties together the strands of volunteering, community service, and civic engagement. Whether you have a specific cause in mind or are looking for volunteer work to beef up a resume or increase professional experience, here are short- and long-term ways to get involved.


 

Vernacular Architecture of West Africa: A World in Dwelling
By: Jean-Paul Bourdier with Trinh T. Minh-ha
Routledge (2011)

The dwellings of hundreds of African ethnic groups offer a variety of conceptions and building practices that contradict the widespread image of the primitive hut commonly attributed to rural Africa. Each house or group of houses is designed not only to shelter the members of a family, but also to enable intimate communication with ancestors and divinities and to harmonize with the forces of nature. Such an architecture thrives in a community context where it is simply not acceptable to plunder resources from the earth, and resources are used only in accordance with their availability, in quantity, and at times of year that minimize environmental impact.


 

Environmental Design Research: The Body, the City and the Buildings in Between
By: Galen Cranz
Cognella (2011)

Understanding the significance of the physical environment in our lives is important to all of us as citizens—and as future design professionals. Through this reader, we want to help urban design, architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture students develop social perspectives on their work.


 

The SAGE Handbook of Architectural Theory
By: Greig Crysler with Stephen Cairns, and Hilde Heynen
SAGE Publications (2011)

The SAGE Handbook of Architectural Theory documents and builds upon some of the most innovative developments in architectural theory over the last two decades. Bringing into dialogue a range of geographically, institutionally and historically competing positions, the book examines and explores parallel debates in related fields. The book organizes itself around specific case studies to provide a critical, interpretive and speculative enquiry into the relevant debates in architectural theory. A methodical, authoritative and comprehensive addition to the literature, the Handbook is suitable for academics, researchers and practitioners in architecture, urban geography, cultural studies, sociology and geography.


 

Geo-Humanities: Art, History, Text at the Edge of Place
By: Michael Dear
Routledge (2011)

In the past decade, there has been a convergence of transdisciplinary thought characterized by geography’s engagement with the humanities, and the humanities’ integration of place and the tools of geography into its studies. GeoHumanities explores the humanities’ rapidly expanding engagement with geography, and the multi-methodological inquiries that analyze the meanings of place, and then reconstructs those meanings to provoke new knowledge as well as the possibility of altered political practices. This book focuses on a range of topics to address urgent contemporary imperatives, such as the link between creativity and place; altered practices of spatial literacy; the increasing complexity of visual representation in art, culture, and science; and the ubiquitous presence of geospatial technologies in the Information Age.


 

Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo
By: Nicholas de Monchaux
The MIT Press (2011)

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of those spacesuits. It is a story of the triumph over the military-industrial complex by the International Latex Corporation, best known by its consumer brand of "Playtex"—a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics.


 

The Good City: Reflections and Imaginations
By: Allan B. Jacobs
Routledge (2011)

Cities, Allan B. Jacobs contends, ought to be magnificent, beautiful places to live. They should be places where people can be fulfilled, where they can be what they can be, where there is freedom, love, ideas, excitement, quiet and joy. Cities ought to be the ultimate manifestation of society’s collective achievements. Written with a wonderfully engaging, humorous tone and Jacobs’ own drawings, The Good City transfers lessons on city design, building and urban change to all those willing to help cities become the magnificent, beautiful places they should be — and encourages all inhabitants to learn to appreciate and explore their own cities.


 

Pastoral Capitalism: A History of Suburban Corporate Landscapes
By: Louise Mozingo
The MIT Press (2011)

By the end of the twentieth century, America’s suburbs contained more office space than its central cities. Many of these corporate workplaces were surrounded, somewhat incongruously, by verdant vistas of broad lawns and leafy trees. In Pastoral Capitalism, Louise Mozingo describes the evolution of these central (but often ignored) features of postwar urbanism in the context of the modern capitalist enterprise. She also considers the globalization of pastoral capitalism in Europe and the developing world including Singapore, India, and China. Pastoral Capitalism offers an indispensible chapter in urban history, examining not only the design of corporate landscapes but also the economic, social, and cultural models that determined their form.


 

The Houses of William Wurster
By: Richard C. Peters with Caitlin Lempres Brostrom
Princeton Architectural Press (2011)

Over the course of a career that spanned forty-five years, William Wilson Wurster (1895-1973) designed hundreds of residences up and down the West Coast. Like Finnish architect Alvar Aalto, with whom Wurster maintained a close professional exchange, Wurster blends modernism with the vernacular. Wurster described these homes as "frames for living": spaces that could be fully transformed by the occupant to meet their needs and desires, well-designed canvases for homemaking. Authors Caitlin Lempres Brostrom, AIA, and Richard C. Peters, FAIA, draw upon extensive historical research as well as personal relationships with Wurster to tell the story of his career, including both residential and institutional building. The Houses of William Wurster features new and archival footage of thirty-three of the architect's best-known houses and includes a foreword by Donlyn Lyndon.


 

Worlding Cities: Asian Experiments and the Art of being Global
By: Ananya Roy
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing (2011)

Worlding Cities is the first serious examination of Asian urbanism to highlight the connections between different Asian models and practices of urbanization. It includes important contributions from a respected group of scholars across a range of generations, disciplines, and sites of study. Worlding Cities describes the new theoretical framework of ‘worlding,’ substantially expands and updates the themes of capital and culture, and demonstrates how references to Asian power, success, and hegemony make possible urban development and limit urban politics. Worlding Cities includes a unique collection of authors across generations, disciplines, and sites of study.