Landscape Architecture + Environmental Planning

LAEP Fall 2017 Courses

Below are currently offered courses for the fall 2017 semester. For any other course information, see the UC Berkeley Online Schedule of Classes.


Lower- and Upper-Division Courses

LD ARCH 12 (HIRSCHFELD)
Environmental Science for Sustainable Development

(4) Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. The scientific basis of sustainability, explored through study of energy, water, food, natural resources, and built environment. Physical/ecological processes and systems, and human impacts from the global scale to local energy/resource use. Energy and water audits of University of California at Berkeley, opportunities to increase sustainability of processes/practices. Discussion/lab section involves data collection/analysis (e.g., Strawberry Creek, atmospheric particulates) and integrative sustainability assessment project.

Topics include the scientific basis of sustainability, explored through study of energy, water, food, natural resources, and the built environment; physical/ecological processes and systems, and human impacts from the global scale to local energy & resource use; and opportunities to increase sustainability of processes/practices.

Discussion/lab section involves data collection/analysis (e.g., Strawberry Creek, atmospheric particulates).

LD ARCH 101 (Staff)
Fundamentals of Landscape Design

(5) Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B or consent of instructor. This studio introduces students to the programmatic, artistic, and technical aspects of land form and topographic adjustments to accommodate human use. Topics include pedestrian and vehicular circulation, conservation and addition of plant materials, movement of water, recreation use, and creation of views. Sculptural land forms will be emphasized through the use of topographic plans, sections, and contour models.

 

Extended Course Description

This course, through a studio format, introduces the concepts, principles and techniques required to design landscapes. The studio is a hands-on experience where students will produce drawings, models and other artifacts to convey their design solutions for the projects assigned.

In the first year landscape architectural studio sequence, it is our intention that students begin to learn to manipulate the three key formal elements available to the landscape designer - the land (topography), architectural form (walls, pavements, small structural objects and furnishings) and vegetation.

Although the projects in this studio will require some experimentation with all three, we will concentrate primarily on the skills required to manipulate topography.

Goals and Objectives
  • To become more thoughtful observers and critics of the built landscape. Learning to observe and evaluate the aesthetic, social and ecological successes of existing landscapes can inform your decisions on your own projects.
  • To develop the ability to embody an idea within the landscape.
  • To develop the ability to think and conceptualize in three dimensions.
  • To develop a design methodology that allows you to identify, analyze and propose a physical solution to a design problem.
  • To learn to think "in scale" that is, to understand how big, how long, and how far various landscapes are in geographic and temporal scale.
  • To develop the graphic communication skills required to convey formal intentions.
  • To develop the ability to visualize three-dimensional earthforms from two-dimensional topographic maps.  You will learn to manipulate topography to achieve both aesthetic and functional intentions.
LD ARCH 103 (Sullivan)
Energy, Fantasy and Form

(5) Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 101, 102, Environmental Design 11A-11B, (Arch 100A or 100B for Architecture students) or by consent of instructor. This is an undergraduate studio with a central focus on climate modification for energy conservation. We will research historical precedents in order to develop new garden forms for passive green designs. We will also explore how past cultures integrated metaphysics into their gardens as an adjunct to microclimate and habitat design. The contemporary landscape should be a balanced interweaving of proportion, function, comfort, energy conservation, and enlightenment. Additionally, we will study the choreography of space and investigate how to animate the landscape through the creative interpretation of text and film. Many new and exciting opportunities lie ahead for the creation of garden forms that not only conserve energy, but are also works of art and places of spiritual renewal.

 

Extended Course Description

LD ARCH 110 (Dronova)
Ecological Analysis

(4) Three hours of lecture per week. Analysis of environmental factors, ecosystem functions, and ecosystem dynamics, as related to decision-making for landscape planning and design.

 

Extended Course Description

Ecological analysis is concerned with developing an understanding of natural factors of the environment. How these factors relate to one another and how they must be considered in landscape design and land use planning are primary concerns of the course. Eight factors will be considered: topography, geology, climate, soil, hydrology, flora, vegetation and fauna. The interactions of these factors in ecosystems will also be explored along with the basic concepts of landscape ecology.

The lecture formats will be used to present the material. Lectures are scheduled Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 8:00 AM in room 315A Wurster Hall.

Grading will be based on laboratory reports (100 points), homework problems (100 points), one mid-term examination (200 points), a laboratory final (100 points), and a final examination (400 points).  Letter grades will be assigned on a percentage basis (90 to 100% = A; 80 to 89% = B; 70 to 79% = C; 60 to 69% = D; <60% = F).

The required readings for LA 110 are collected in a reader, which is available from a local copy service (Copy Central on Bancroft Avenue). The reader is also on reserve in the Environmental Design Library. Numerous maps, tables, and diagrams are used in the lectures. These have been put together in "An Illustrated Outline of Ecological Analysis" which is also available from a Copy Central.

LD ARCH 110L (Dronova)
Ecological Analysis Laboratory

(2) Four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Landscape Architecture 110 (may be taken concurrently). Introduction to field techniques for assessment of landscape factors. Factors include topography, geology, climate, soil, hydrology, flora, vegetation, and wildlife.

LD ARCH 111 (Hindle)
Plants in Design: From Natural and Cultural Precedents to Urban Systems

(3) Three hours of lecture per week. Through lecture, research, and studio assignments, this course introduces the use of plants as design elements in the landscape, from the urban scale to the site-specific scale, focusing on the public open space. By analyzing historic, contemporary, and Bay Area examples, the course examines the spatial, visual, and sensory qualities of vegetation, as well as the interplay with ecological functions and engineering uses of plants.

Extended Course Description

This course focuses on urban planting design as a technological and aesthetic practice rooted in natural and cultural precedent. Coursework and readings will emphasize the dynamic role of plants in cities and the inherent complexity of designing with a living medium.  Weekly lectures, practicums, and analytical exercises will synthesize subjects covered in the course and provide students with an intellectual framework, reliable methodology, and contemporary skillset to approach planting design in urbanized areas. The course requires extensive out of class reading, the completion of individual analytical exercises, and the ability/desire to draw using digital and analog media. The class format alternates between lecture and in-class workshop/lab.

Course Objectives:

- Generate enthusiasm for plants as a design medium
- Establish an essential knowledge base of biotic/abiotic factors in urban planting design
- Develop a design lexicon for the role plants in contemporary landscape architecture and urbanism
- Introduce fundamental technical information for the cultivation of plants in constructed environments
- Cultivate a critical eye and individual design aesthetic
- Introduce process media and representational standards relating to planting design

Required Books & Readings:

• Capon, Brian. Botany for gardeners. Timber Press, 2010.
• Dunnett, Nigel, and James Hitchmough. The Dynamic Landscape: Design, Ecology and Management of Naturalistic Urban Planting. London: Taylor & Francis, 2008
• All other required readings will be provided

Reference Books & Recommended

• Perry, Bob. Landscape Plants for California Gardens: An Illustrated Reference of Plants for California Landscapes. Claremont, Calif: Land Design Pub, 2010
 

LD ARCH 120 (Lemon)
Topographic Form and Design Technology

(3) Two hours of lecture and two hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 102 or consent of instructor. Technical, graphic and computational exercises, and studio problems in topographic site design and the shaping of the site for surface drainage.

Extended Course Description

LA 120 builds on the critical thinking and technical skills introduced in LA 101, continuing the exploration of ideas, materials, and processes involving earthwork and water. The exercises and research will help develop grading-related skills and knowledge required to professionally practice landscape architecture. The course gives a foundation of basic concepts and skills, with more complex exercises as the course progresses.

Short assignments will be given for each technical skill presented in class. Classes will include a review of the previous assignment, a brief lecture introducing new material, and project discussion or desk crits. Readings will be assigned when relevant. Case study research and presentations may be required.

In addition, the course will introduce typical site drainage structures and methods, road alignment concepts, the organization of typical contract documents and specifications, and digital representation of such documents. A few short field trips will be taken to illustrate the topics, including walking tours on campus and trips to grading-related projects (completed or under construction).

Equipment:
Typical drafting equipment and a hand calculator will be necessary.

Grading Policy:
Students will be graded on the regular assignments and on participation in lecture and lab. Later assignments will receive more weight, to emphasize the students’ progress in mastering the principles of grading and drainage.

Required Text:
Site Engineering for Landscape Architects (4th ed., 2004) by Steven Strom and Kurt Nathan

Optional Texts:
Grade Easy by Richard Untermann
Timesaver Standards for Landscape Architecture by Nicholas Dines and Charles Harris

LD ARCH 134A (Hood)
Drawing Workshop I

(3) Two hours of lecture and three hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B or consent of instructor. This studio will elaborate on a number of studio themes while introducing the students to a variety of graphic mediums and drawing techniques. Measured drawing procedures (including orthographic projections) will be augmented by figure-ground principles and themes of contrast, color, chiaroscuro, and compositions. On-site and visits to galleries and museums will complement the studio sessions.

LD ARCH 134B (Kullmann)
Drawing Workshop II

(3) Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B or consent of instructor. This course introduces students to digital tools relevant to the discipline of landscape architecture. The course encompasses a series of lectures, lab exercises, and projects designed to equip students with a solid and expandable computing skill base relevant to the learning and practice of landscape architecture. Beyond technical competency, particular emphasis is placed on empowering students to move freely and creatively between software programs as an effective way of representing landscape.

Enrollment

Enrolled students who do not attend the first class will be dropped from the course, unless you have contacted the instructor in advance.

Prerequisites

General dexterity with everyday computing applications is highly recommended: the syllabus assumes that students are generally comfortable using PC’s or Macs and have an ‘everyday’ knowledge of Adobe Photoshop. The course also assumes familiarity with the idea of CAD but prior proficiency is not a prerequisite. No prior ‘rendering’ or ‘modeling’ knowledge is required

LD ARCH 135 (Sullivan)
The Art of Landscape Drawing

(3) Two hours of lecture and four hours of studio per week. This course develops freehand drawing as an integral part of the creative process and as an expressive design tool. A broad range of exercises is employed to help students progressively gain creativity, skill, and confidence in their drawing. Various media such as ink, colored pencils, and watercolor are explored as a method to design innovative landscapes. A variety of presentation techniques will be investigated for communicating landscape design. In addition to field sketching, there will be excursions to art galleries, artists' studios, and other creative environments. Through the integration of drawing with intuition and imagination, students will be able to bring their visions to reality.

 

Extended Course Description

The only media for showing an object in its uniqueness is the visual arts. We ought to talk less and draw more and, like organic nature, communicate everything we have to say in sketches.

J.W. Goethe, Italian Journey
Course Overview

Drawing is the foundation to creative problem solving and critical thinking, and as such is an integral part of environmental design. LA 135 emphasizes drawing in a wide variety of media to help students realize their full creative potential. The main objective of this studio is to explore the intuitive part of the design process and help individuals express their visions for a sustainable future. Exploration, experimentation and analysis will be encouraged. Drawing promotes a holistic approach to design and empowers one's creativity.

This course develops freehand drawing as an integral part of the creative process and as an expressive design tool. A broad range of exercises is employed to help students progressively gain creativity, skill, and confidence in their drawing. Various media such as ink, colored pencils, and watercolor are explored as a method to design innovative landscapes.  A variety of presentation techniques will be investigated for communicating landscape design. In addition to field sketching, there will be excursions to art galleries, artists’ studios, and other creative environments. Through the integration of drawing with intuition and imagination, students will be able to bring their visions to reality

LD ARCH C171 (Mozingo)
The American Designed Landscape Since 1850

(3) Three hours of lecture per week. This course surveys the history of American landscape architecture since 1850 in four realms: 1) urban open spaces--that is squares, plazas, parks, and recreation systems; 2) urban and suburban design; 3) regional and environmental planning; 4) gardens. The course will review the cultural and social contexts which have shaped and informed landscape architecture in the United States since the advent of the public parks movement, as well as, the aesthetic precepts, environmental concerns, horticultural practices, and technological innovations of American landscapes. Students will complete a midterm, final, and a research assignment. Also listed as American Studies C171.

 

Extended Course Description

This course surveys the history of American landscape architecture since 1850 including the rise of the public parks movement, the development of park systems, the establishment of the national parks, the landscape of the Progressive Era, suburbs, and the modernist landscape.  The survey encompasses urban open spaces, conservation landscapes, urban design, environmental planning, and gardens.  It reviews the economic, cultural and social contexts that have shaped and informed landscape architecture in the United States, as well as the aesthetic precepts, environmental concerns, horticultural practices, and technological innovations of American landscapes.

Prerequisites:None

LD ARCH C188 (Radke)
Geographic Information Systems

(4) Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Some computer experience. Formerly C188X. This course introduces the student to the rapidly expanding field of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It addresses both theory and application and provides the student with a dynamic analytical framework within which temporal and spatial data and information is gathered, integrated, interpreted, and manipulated. It emphasizes a conceptual appreciation of GIS and offers an opportunity to apply some of those concepts to contemporary geographical and planning issues. Also listed as Geography C188.

Extended Course Description

The course is designed to introduce the student to the rapidly expanding field of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).  It addresses both theory and application and provides the student with a framework within which spatial problems can be identified and solutions generated. A Geographic information system is not merely an electronic tool kit designed to direct and facilitate the research interests of scientists and planners.   Rather, GIS are a continually evolving, dynamic analytical framework within which data and information are gathered, interpreted, and manipulated, providing the researcher with a comprehensive medium where space, time and information may be integrated.  This course will emphasize a conceptual appreciation of Geographic Information Systems and offer an opportunity to apply some of those concepts to contemporary geographical and planning issues.

A clear definition of GIS begins by defining its component terms:

The term geographic implies at the very least notions of dealing with the surface of the earth.  A realistic generalization of this term might expand the idea of the earth's surface to include notions of dealing with the concept of space itself.

Information is knowledge acquired from facts and data.  These facts and data are characteristics abstracted from phenomena understudy.  Collecting, assembling and integrating these data provides knowledge and intelligence about the phenomena being studied.

A system is a method, plan or procedure with operational rules to establish order and assemble a set or arrangement of data.  If the data integration results in knowledge and contains information of a spatial nature, then the system is a GIS.  Although a GIS need not be automated, the contemporary definitions in the literature state or imply the notion of a computer based system.

The Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) defines GIS as follows: a system, usually computer-based, for the input, storage, retrieval, analysis and display of interpreted geographic data.  The database is typically composed of map-like spatial representations often called coverages or layers.  These layers may involve a three-dimensional matrix of time, location, and attribute or activity.  A GIS may include digital line graph (DLG) data, digital elevation models (DEM), geographic names, land-use characterizations, land ownership, land cover, registered satellite and/or aerial photography along with other associated or derived geographic data.  [FGDC, 1994].

Course Structure:
The course consists of both a lecture and 'hands-on' laboratory sessions each week.  The lectures will discuss spatial theory, models and decomposition, as well as methods and applications of GIS.  The laboratory sessions will provide a practical introduction to tools used to gather, assemble, encode, analyze and map spatial data.

Topics Covered:
* Data discovery; data sources; data gathering; data organization; data management and control.
* Information, systems and space; spatial sampling; spatial and non-spatial data structures; spatial dimension encoded as points, lines and polygons; scale; spatial characterization and association.
* Database and project design; data gathering; database construction; geo-positioning; global positioning systems (GPS); map projections; digitizing existing published maps; spatial data formats; spatial data standards; data translation; data quality, precision and accuracy; boundary and data error.
* Remote sensing; classification analysis; ancillary data.
* Data dictionaries, meta data and standards.
* Spatial operations; measurement; classification; polygon overlay; disaggregation and dissolve.
* Spatial analysis; modeling techniques and landscape characterization.
* Surface models; interpolation; location and allocation.
* Data output and map construction; output formats and output devices.
* Caveats, common failures and new directions in GIS.

Course Restrictions:
This course does not have a limit on enrollment at this time.  Attempts will be made to accommodate all interested students.  There are eight laboratory sections, the ideal size 25 students each.  There are 50 workstations available during each laboratory session. 

Prerequisites:
Prior experience with computers is required. Although laboratory assignments during the term can be successfully completed by using two of the four available hardware platforms, additional flexibility will be to your advantage.

Course Text:  
GIS Fundamentals: A First Text on Geographic Information Systems, by Paul Bolstad.

Laboratory Manual:
Available online before each laboratory session.

Evaluation:
Laboratory assignments - 40%
Mid-term - 20%
Final Exam - 40%

The GIS Laboratory Facility:
214 Wurster Hall

Laboratory Access:
Each student enrolled in the course must purchase access for the term.  Forms will be available the first week of class.  A signature from the GSI or Instructor is required to gain access.  Access is 24 hours/day during the semester.  Student computer accounts will be deactivated when laboratory keycard access is not current.

Application Software:
The main software system used in the laboratory will be ArcGIS by Environmental Systems Research Institute. The software is already loaded on all the computers in 214 Wurster, but if you would like to load it on your own computer, you can obtain a disk from your GSI.

Hardware:
Computers: The GIS laboratory has Windows-based computers.

 Plotters: Laser (Black/White and color - 8.5x11inches)
                HP (Color - 36x48inches)
 

LD ARCH 189 (Cooper)
REPRESENTATION AS RESEARCH: Contemporary Topics in Landscape Visualizations 

(3) Three hours of lecture and lab per week. Through lectures, technical tutorials, and reading discussions, this course will profile contemporary landscape research practices and representational techniques. We will use visualization to advance landscape research, theory, and site analysis, focusing specifically on methods that tackle issues of temporality and ephemerality, and generate original media that communicates spatial, ecological, and cultural complexities.

Extended Course Description


Naturgemälde, by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (1803)

 

This course explores the following topics:
(1) Representation as a form of research, both as a tool for conducting it and as an output for its dissemination.
(2) Landscape research that combines scientific explorations with the more humanistic aspects of site analysis and design.
(3) Development of methods of representation and applied techniques for research and communication of landscape design.

The course is divided into three units, each exploring a specific representational theme. Units are structured through lectures and discussions about the historical and theoretical relevance of the theme in conjunction with lab sessions focused on demonstrating representational tools and techniques.
 

LD ARCH 197 (Staff)
Field Study in Landscape Architecture

(2-3) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of instructor and sponsor. Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. See departmental information sheet for limitations. Supervised experience relative to specific aspects of landscape architecture. Regular individual meetings with faculty and outside sponsor. Reports required.
 


Graduate Courses

LD ARCH 200A (Hindle)
Fundamentals of Landscape Design

(5) Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Formerly Landscape Architecture 101. This studio introduces students to the programmatic, artistic, and technical aspects of land form and topographic adjustments to accommodate human use. Topics include pedestrian and vehicular circulation, conservation and addition of plant materials, movement of water, recreation use, and creation of views. Sculptural land forms will be emphasized through the use of topographic plans, sections, and contour models.

 

Extended Course Description

Students in this beginning design course are either in the first year of our 3-year design program or the first year of our 2-year Environmental Planning program. Thanks to some recent curriculum changes, this is an experiment intended to strengthen the conceptual and skill-development linkages between insights at the landscape and site scales. We begin by introducing landscapes as biophysical and social realities that we can understand conditionally, both through our senses and through map construction.

Next, students are introduced to design by requiring them to propose a linear intervention – the path. Design as a process is introduced as a mix of conceptual, analytical and material engagements, with a focus on the embodied experience of changes in space, time and materials. The larger context of landscape processes is brought into the studio using approximations, expressed as spatial algorithms.

EP and 3D students develop responses to the same design assignments until the final four weeks of the term, crossing from 200 scale to 100 scale to 40 scale to 16th scale to 1/8 scale to 1⁄4 scale to 1⁄2 scale drawings. Everyone has the opportunity to work with GIS and CAD tools, as well as Illustrator.

 

LD ARCH 201 (Dronova)
Ecological Factors in Urban Landscape Design

(5) Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 110, 134A-134B, or consent of instructor. Through lectures, studio problems, research projects, and discussion, this course will explore the challenge and potential incorporating ecological factors in urban contexts. The course focuses on the interaction of landscape science (hydrology, geology, etc.) with the necessities and mechanisms of the human environment (urban design, transportation, economics, etc.). Lectures and research projects will particularly emphasize innovative and forward thinking solutions to the ecological problems of the human environment. Throughout the semester, reading and discussion sessions will highlight the connections between the broader concerns of the global ecological crisis and landscape design and planning.

 

Extended Course Description

Through lectures, field trips, studio projects, student research, and discussion this course will explore the interrelationship of ecological factors with landscape design and planning in an urban context. The course will focus on the ecological assessment and design of places along the urban, suburban, industrial, agricultural, and rural creek corridors in the Petaluma River watershed, including downtown Petaluma.

Students will be encouraged to develop thoughtful, innovative, and responsive urban landscape design solutions to problems uncovered in the corridor as a means of balancing healthy ecosystem function with the built human environment.

Lectures will emphasize the importance of understanding basic ecological principles as a basis for design and planning, and will highlight the connections between global ecological crises and landscape design and planning. Students will incorporate ecological knowledge into planning at the regional scale as well as at the site design scale in studio projects. Students will also do independent research on contemporary landscape architectural design projects and report on their relative successes and failures in achieving a sustainable balance of healthy ecosystem function with the designed human environment.

Prerequisites:  LD ARCH 110, 134A, 134B – either taken concurrently with this course or waived by consent of instructor
 
Introduction:

This course is entitled “Ecological Factors in Urban Landscape Design”.  The title itself reveals a strong emphasis on creatively synthesizing ecologically-based landscape analysis with landscape design and planning challenges.

The studio takes as a starting point the notion that in today’s and tomorrow’s world, ecological factors are of paramount importance in considering the planning, design, and management of the land. Ecological factors include all those influences that bear upon the “ecology” of place, i.e., all interactions among humans and the totality of the environment.  In addition to closely examining fluvial geomorphology, flood hazards, soils, vegetation, hydrology, climate, and fauna, we will also consider infrastructure, energy, transportation, development, land use, wastewater treatment, solid waste, and open space as ecological factors. Implicit in the title and embodied in the course structure is an essential transaction between types of approaches to problem solving directed at resilient long-term processes, not simply designed objects. This course requires both a willingness and ability to blend reasoned, quantitative spatial analysis and three dimensional creative syntheses.  In presenting land analysis, planning and design information to students, the course expects students to be willing to learn across this broad spectrum of activities. In the past, occasionally students have shied away from either the quantitative analysis or the design synthesis tasks as being unfamiliar, uncomfortable, or both. This course seeks an integration of the science behind landscape analysis and planning and the creative spatial and visual thinking required of resolving design projects.

 

Course Learning Objectives

  • Learn to recognize healthy natural ecosystems
  • Learn to recognize built environments that have mutually supportive relationships with healthy nature
  • Learn to integrate ecological principals and processes into spatial design resolution
  • Develop skills in researching, analyzing, and interpreting landscapes
  • Develop the ability to synthesize background research into design and planning
  • Develop a sense of how design concepts are accountable to local and global ecological and cultural issues
  • Begin to develop a personal design ethic founded in ecologically and culturally sensitive principles
  • Develop sophisticated conceptual skills including originality, inventiveness. and lateral problem solving
  • Develop an exploratory design process, utilizing prolific sketching – hand, computer, or model
  • Develop excellent graphic and oral communication skills
  • Foster a sense of collegiality and interdisciplinary understanding through the studio environment 

Pedagogy:
Instruction will be conducted via the following techniques:

  • Lectures: Used to introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, methods, and ideas by instructors as well as a variety of guest experts in the field.  Students will be encouraged to question and discuss during and following   each lecture.
  • Field Trips/Site Visits: Field trips to the overall site and selected other destinations overseen by instructors.  Individual site visits by students will also be necessary to complete their projects.
  • Studio Discussion: Studio based discussions are a core component of the studio experience to share perceptions, research, and assessments, and will be encouraged throughout the course
  • Group Critiques: A forum for evaluating fellow student work, to be integrated into studio time periodically
  • Individual Critiques: One-on-one critiques at each student’s desk by an instructor or the GSI as requested is a primary technique for guiding students’ work, responding directly to their individual questions, and challenging them individually. When individual critiques are scheduled, students should always bring new creative work to the table for discussion.  Individual critiques may not always be the most efficient way of communicating when multiple students are grappling with common problems.
  • Informal Pin-Ups: Informal pin-ups in the studio will be used as a vehicle to take collective stock of where everyone is and where everyone needs to head.  Pin-ups will typically involve discussing design work in progress, but for effective feedback still require students to gather their thoughts and edit their drawings beforehand.
  • Reviews: Formal reviews will involve the attendance of outside invited critics who have knowledge of or a vested interest in the subject matter.  Final presentation quality drawings and related material are required for the Second and Final Reviews.
 
LD ARCH 203 (Kullmann)
Landscape Project Design

(5) Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 201, or consent of instructor. A site design studio stressing the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to the thoughtful execution of design ideas at the site scale. Typical projects will focus on the experiential rather than the pictorial. Projects might include a park, plaza, or rehabilitation of a brownfield site.

 

Extended Course Description

This studio stresses the shaping and development of ideas from initial concept to their execution at the site scale in complex urban environments. The focus is on both the design process itself and the resulting product, with an emphasis on the performance and experiential aspects of composition rather than the pictorial. Each step of the process will be facilitated by specific studio assignments, short lectures, and in-class discussion and exercises.

The studio has two primary goals. The first goal is that students approach their work conceptually, strongly anchoring their ideas on the unique characteristics of the project’s site. Instead of solely focusing on solving problems or addressing specific program requirements, the class will design landscapes that embody ideas. Students will be encouraged to experiment, to realize concepts through clear interventions, and to make landscapes that emerge from and celebrate place.

The second goal is to pursue the thoughtful execution of ideas – taking concepts beyond collage and sketch models to discover a design’s true physicality. Models and drawings, full scale if need be, will be created to explore materiality, form, scale, proportion, tectonics, and change over time.

 
LD ARCH C203 (Hood)
The City and the Museum

(5) Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 201, or consent of instructor. A site design studio stressing the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to the thoughtful execution of design ideas at the site scale. Typical projects will focus on the experiential rather than the pictorial. Projects might include a park, plaza, or rehabilitation of a brownfield site.

 

Extended Course Description

The studio will explore how small hybrid urban landscapes associated with community arts institutions can contribute to new languages and expressions for landscapes that are specific to the culture that produces and maintains them.  Issues of place, identity, race, ownership, social and cultural practices, ecology and history are a few topics highlighted.  Three sites in three different US communities will serve as case studies.

 

The Pulitzer Art Foundation, St. Louis MO, hosts a front and back yard lot and street context outside of its Tadao Ando designed inner precinct.  How can the design of the street and adjacent lots add to the museum and civic experience while harnessing the neighborhood’s rich latent and nascent cultural/ ecological history?

 

The August Wilson Home, Pittsburgh PA and Hill District neighborhood, is being restored to create a community arts institution and historic site for one of the most celebrated African American Playwrights of the 20th century.  The recent cinema release “Fences”, starring Denzel Washington and Viola Davis highlight this neighborhood and site in its cinematic background.    The movie and subsequent Wilson revival anniversary events have led to the re-imagination of this historic building and landscape site and neighborhood.

 

The Henry J Kaiser Civic Arena, Oakland CA, is restored as Arts, Office and Entrepenurial civic space.  Adorned with seven beautiful Calder niches along its front façade, a new civic porch and public way will host public gatherings, food and dining, and special events…. such as the Warriors Basketball team parade and presentations.

 

MLA and MCP students who are required to take this course towards their degree will be admitted. Non-MLA and MCP will need consent of the instructor to obtain a permission number.
 

LD ARCH 227 (Staff)
Restoration of Rivers and Streams

 

(3) Three hours of seminar per week. Prior background in hydrology, geomorphology, ecology, restoration, or consent of instructor. Description: This course reviews the underlying goals and assumptions of river and stream restoration projects, reviews techniques employed in these efforts, and emphasizes strategies for evaluation of project success. The course focuses on geomorphic and hydrologic analyses relevant to restoration and enhancement of aquatic and riparian habitat in freshwater systems. Format: lectures by instructor, guest lectures, presentation of student independent projects, and field trips. Course requirement: independent term project involving original research.

 

Extended Course Description

With the increasing popularity of river and stream restoration in the US and abroad, restoration has attracted supporters and practitioners from a variety of fields.  However, river and stream restoration is not a distinct discipline in itself, but rather involves the application of sound geomorphological, hydrologic, and ecological science to the problem of restoring ecosystem functions to a river system.  The purpose of this course is to explore the field of river and stream restoration, with particular emphasis on geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecological processes essential to the healthy functioning (and thus ecological restoration) of river systems, the role of scientific information in project planning and design, and the post-project evaluation of project performance.  Although this course covers some specific techniques in river restoration, its emphasis is more on the systemic understanding that should underlie restoration planning.  Instruction on specific techniques of bank stabilization, installation of fish habitat structures, etc. are presented in numerous workshops and short courses elsewhere. This course seeks to address the more fundamental issues of whether we should be "restoring" rivers to begin with, and how to restore channel processes that maintain habitat, rather than treating symptoms through approaches such as artificial fish habitat structures and bank stabilization.

Class Format

The class meets once per week, from 6:00-9:30 PM Wednesday evenings..  In many class sessions, professionals active in the field of aquatic and riparian restoration make presentations or participate in discussions.  There is also an intensive field techniques training session and two Saturday field trips, and a river restoration symposium to present term projects.

Class Requirements

The course is designed to follow on from Ld Arch 222 (Hydrology for Planners), and it assumes a number of concepts and methods from that course (see list of concepts).  If you don’t have this background, the field methods training may be sufficient to fill out your background (consult with instructor).  Requirements: participate in class discussions, write a brief, critical review of a stream restoration plan/proposal, and conduct an independent term project, in most cases a post-project appraisal of a built project.  For the term project, prepare a tight 10-page paper, make a 10-15-minute presentation, and to provide critical peer review comments on another student’s draft paper.  After undergoing two rounds of review and revision, the final paper will be added to the collection of the Water Resources Center Archives.  Past projects: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/cgi-bin/oac/berkeley/wrca

 
LD ARCH C242 (Chaplick)
Citizen Involvement in the City Planning Process: Citizen Participation: Planning and Design for the Inclusive City

(3) Three hours of lecture/seminar per week. An examination of the roles of the citizens and citizen organizations in the city planning process. Models for citizen involvement ranging from advising to community control. Examination of the effectiveness of different organizational models in different situations. Also listed as City and Regional Planning C261.

Extended Course Description

Involving people in planning and design decisions is an essential part of most planning and design projects in the United States. Good citizen engagement requires application of a specific set of methods and skills. It is a process of both giving information as well as collecting, analyzing and applying information. If done correctly the practitioner gains valuable information that will enhance the outcomes of a project in multiple ways politically, environmentally, socially, aesthetically and/or financially. If done poorly the result can have highly negative consequences. Involving people in a public planning context is different from involving people in site-specific design. The process in each case starts with different objectives and requires different methods. Results are applied in very distinct ways.

This class will expose students to the range of both the theory and practice of engaging people in planning and design projects. Students will design and execute a community engagement project with a real organization, critique contemporary participatory planning in the United States and be trained to facilitate a public process

The class will meet once a week for three hours combining a series of lectures, discussions, guest speakers, public meetings, individual and team presentations and exercises. Lectures will draw on the readings, but will not duplicate them. Class time will allow for discussion, teamwork and student/instructor interaction. 

Meets the Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities elective requirement

 
LD ARCH 252B (Cooper)
Thesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar

(3) One and one-half hours of seminar and one and one-half hours of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 252A. Students learn research methods including social factors, historical/archival, design exploration, master planning, theoretical, and scientific field work. Students develop a conceptual framework, survey instrument, literature review, and detailed work plan. A full committee and funding proposal due on the last day of class.

 

Extended Course Description

Building off the momentum from the spring semester (LA252A) and their summer research, students will continue to develop their research projects for a thesis or professional report (PR). We will work together to refine the research topic through writing, editing, discussion and presentations. At the end of the semester, students will submit a complete first draft of their project to their committees.

The objectives of this course are the following:

  • Narrow the focus of your research topic into a discrete, manageable contribution of knowledge
  • Develop a 30 second (2-3 sentences) and 3 minute (1-2 paragraphs) presentation of your thesis/PR topic
  • Develop a detailed outline of your thesis/PR
  • Develop a work schedule for the remainder of your project
  • Develop your research and citation skills
  • Develop your editing skills through peer review
  • Refine your own writing and ideas through multiple drafts and editing
  • Present your project progress to the class and your committee
  • Complete your research design, which includes writing draft literature review and methods chapters
  • Complete a draft of your analysis research and graphics

Submit a complete a first draft to your committee at the end of the semester

 
LD ARCH 253 (PhD Student)
Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Colloquium

(1) One and one-half hours of lecture per week. Course may be repeated for credit. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Invited lectures on current research, planning practice, and design projects. Out of approximately 14 presentations per term, typically two or three would be by department faculty, two or three by graduating students, the remainder by outside speakers.

 

Extended Course Description

The main theme of the class is: “The Global South, Common sustainability challenges (Causes & Solutions)” This can vary from sustainability challenges, to environmental impacts, forests degradation, excessive urbanization, use of energy and renewable resources. And the focus of the class is to understand the main causes, the different solutions and the sustainability best practices. The audience will be graduate students from Landscape & Environmental Planning, City Planning, Architecture, and other departments as well. This is a series lectures given by scholars, professionals and experts in fields related to the global South, anchored around sustainability and environmental impacts. 

In addition to coming every week, there is a short questionnaire that you must fill out to receive credit.
NOTE: THIS CLASS WILL START PROMPTLY at 1:05 pm. Please arrive on time as a courtesy to the speaker.

LD ARCH 254 - Section 002 (Kullmann)
Topics in LAEP: Ground Up Journal

(1) One to five hours of seminar per week. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Designed to be a forum for presentation of student research, discussions with faculty researchers and practitioners, and examination of topical issues in landscape architecture and environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.

Extended Course Description

To come.

LD ARCH 254 - Section 003 (Hindle)
Topics in LAEP: LD ARCH 200A Supplemental Section

(1) One to five hours of seminar per week. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Designed to be a forum for presentation of student research, discussions with faculty researchers and practitioners, and examination of topical issues in landscape architecture and environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
 

Extended Course Description
 

LD ARCH 200a and 254 are administratively separate classes, but grading and curriculum for the courses are shared, with LD ARCH 254 designed as support course that provides additional lectures, workshops, and feedback). This course emphasizes the role of studio as a creative and engaging shared venue through which to explore ideas about the designed landscape. You are expected to participate through discussion, image making, modeling, reading, and collaboration with you peers and instructors. You are also encouraged to integrate your diverse backgrounds and experiences into studio. Studio is, however, a unique learning environment with requirements that differ from convention lecture of seminar courses. 
 

LD ARCH 254 - Section 004 (Cranz)
Topics in LAEP: Playground Design and the Giant Eye

(1) One to five hours of seminar per week. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Designed to be a forum for presentation of student research, discussions with faculty researchers and practitioners, and examination of topical issues in landscape architecture and environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
 

Extended Course Description
 

Cross-listed with Arch 219X Special Topic: Playground Design and the Giant Eye Friday mornings 10-1, room 801 Wurster This seminar establishes the groundwork for a design-build studio in spring 2018 on playground design involving an interactive learning structure. The Giant Eye is a model of the human visual pathway all the way to the brain that children (and adults) can move through in order to experience anatomy three-dimenionally. As a small building, it is also a sculpture, a contribution to the playground landscape, and at any scale it is a playful, engaging learning experience. In the fall 2017 we will visit the site, make some basic decisions regarding scale and materials, review literature on playground theory, and directly experience EyeBody theory as developed by Peter Grunwald, EyeBody. Students who take this seminar do not have to take the studio in the spring, and those who are unable to take the seminar are still eligible to take the studio in the spring, but this seminar will help the studio students be able to produce construction drawings by spring break, so that contruction can proceed on schedule. Learning outcomes: foundations of playground theory, practical experience in site analysis, practical experience in interviewing clients, how the human visual system works.

LD ARCH 255 (Mozingo)
Doctoral Seminar in Environmental Planning

(1) Course may be repeated for credit. Course meets every other week. Prerequisites: Doctoral student or consent of instructor. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Designed to be a forum for presentation of doctoral student research, discussions with faculty researchers and environmental planning practitioners, and examination of topical issues in environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.

 

Extended Course Description

This course will be a forum for discussion of urban design and environmental planning theory and methods, as well as research topics of mutual interest to members of the class.  Students will discuss their own research areas and ideas for dissertation topics.  The agenda will be established with the input of students.

Meetings of about 2 hours will be held alternate weeks.

The course is open to doctoral students in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning and the Department of City and Regional Planning.

LD ARCH 295 (Staff)
Supervised Research in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

(2) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and appointment as a research assistant. Credit option: Any combination of 295 or 297 may be taken for a total of six units maximum toward the M.L.A degree. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Supervised experience on a research project in landscape architecture and/or environmental planning. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor required. See departmental sheet for other limitations.

LD ARCH 296 (Staff)
Directed Dissertation Research

(1–12) Hours to be arranged. Three hours per unit. Prerequisites: Advancement to Ph.D. candidacy. Course may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Open to qualified students who have been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree and are directly engaged upon the doctoral dissertation.

LD ARCH 297 (Staff)
Supervised Field Study

(2–3) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Any combination of 295 or 297 may be taken for a total of six units maximum towards a M.L.A. degree. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Supervised experience relative to specific aspects of practice in landscape architecture and/or environmental planning. Regular meetings with faculty and outside sponsor as well as final report required. See departmental information sheet for other limitations.

LD ARCH 298 (Staff)
Group Study

(1-4) Hours to be arranged. Course may be repeated for credit. Special group studies.

LD ARCH 299 (Staff)
Individual Research

(1-6) Hours to be arranged. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Research work conducted preparatory to completion of the thesis or professional project as well as other approved research. A maximum of six units will be counted toward the M.L.A degree. The six units allows for four units maximum for thesis or professional project research, and two units maximum for other approved research. See departmental information sheet for other limitations.

LD ARCH 300 (Staff)
Supervised TEaching In Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

(2) Course may be repeated for credit. Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and appointment as a Teaching Assistant. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Supervised teaching experience in undergraduate courses. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor. See departmental sheet for other limitations.

LD ARCH 375 (Staff)- Will be taught by DCRP
Methods of Teaching in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

(2)Two hours of seminar/discussion per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate student standing. Formerly Landscape Architecture 301. This course presents general pedagogical principles and methods adapted to teaching in the fields of landscape architecture, environmental planning, and environmental sciences. The format varies from week to week, but involves presentations by faculty and experienced graduate student instructors (GSIs), guided discussions, sharing of teaching experiences for current GSIs, discussion of readings on effective teaching, viewing of videos, and presentation by GSIs of sections for upcoming weeks. Required of all graduate students to be eligible for appointment as GSIs; may be taken concurrently with first GSI position for entering students. Topics include learning objectives, lesson plans, active learning, group learning, classroom diversity, assessing student learning, giving constructive feedback, teaching in the studio environment, engaging students through field exercises, grading, and composing effective tests. (F,SP) Staff

 

Extended Course Description

 This course is intended for first time Graduate Student Instructors in the Department of Landscape Architecture. Designed to ensure that participants are prepared to face the demands of the semester, this course focuses on making sure participants complete all the University requirements associated with teaching while developing your own pedagogical approach.  Through the exploration of a variety of teaching strategies and examination of their in-class experience as instructors, participants will enhance their knowledge and skills in teaching, facilitating, and presenting.

LD ARCH 601 (Staff)
Individual Study for Master's Students

(1-8) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Last semester of residence in M.L.A. program. Credit option: Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for master's degree. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Individual study for final degree requirements in consultation with adviser.

LD ARCH 602 (Staff)
Individual Study for Doctoral Students

(1-8) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: For candidates for doctor's degree. Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for doctoral degree. Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D.