ARCHITECTURE

ARCH Fall 2017 Courses

Below are currently offered courses for the fall 2017 semester. For any other course information, see the UC Berkeley Online Schedule of Classes.

Lower and Upper Division Courses

 

Arch 11A [Fields]

Introduction to Visual Representation and Drawing

Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.

Prerequisites: Env Des 1 with C- or better.

Description: (Formerly Env Des 11A) Introductory studio course: theories of representation and the use of several visual means, including freehand drawing and digital media, to analyze and convey ideas regarding the environment. Topics include contour, scale, perspective, color, tone, texture, and design.

 

ARCH 98BC [Crawford] 

 

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. (F,SP)

 

ARCH100A [Iwamoto] 

Fundamentals of Architectural Design

  • Course Format: Two hours of lecture, six hours of studio, and two hours of computer graphics laboratory per week.
  • Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken in sequence.
  • Description: Introductory courses in the design of buildings. Problems emphasize conceptual strategies of form and space, site relationships and social, technological and environmental determinants.
  • 100A focuses on the conceptual design process.
  • 100B stresses tectonics, materials, and energy considerations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings and field trips. (F,SP)

 

ARCH 100C [Staff] 

Architectural Design III

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
  • Description: This is a studio course in architectural design. Students work on individual and group design projects that build on topics from Architecture 100B with additional integration of conditions pertinent to architectural production that may include architectural precedents, context, landscape and urban issues, envelope, performance, structure, and tectonics in the design of buildings.
  • There are five studio sections each with its own project.
  • Eligible students should enroll in Arch 100C, Sec 001 and participate in the lottery after the faculty studio presentations to determine which section to enroll.

 

ARCH 102A [Staff]  

Capstone Project Preparation Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
  • Prerequisites: Architecture 100A, Architecture 100B.
  • Description: This course is a course in architectural research methods with an emphasis on collaborative work. Students will work on individual facets of a collective topic of critical importance to the contemporary discipline of architecture within areas of faculty expertise. These include: architectural history and theory, structures, materials and methods of construction, building performance, energy and environment, and social factors and human behavior in architecture and the environment. The goal of Capstone Preparation is to develop a coherent research proposal that will be used as a topic for the Capstone Project course taken the following semester. 

Extended Course Description

Coming soon

 

Arch 110AC [Cranz]

The Social and Cultural Basis of Design

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/forum and one hour of discussion per week.
  • Description: This course focuses on the significance of the physical environment for citizens and future design professionals. This course is an introduction to the field of human-environment studies, taught from an American Cultures perspective. Its objectives include: 1) being able to use the concepts in person-environment relations, 2) understanding how these concepts vary by subculture, primarily Anglo-, Hispanic-, and Chinese-American, 3) learning to use the methodological skills needed to conduct architectural programming and evaluation research, 4) thinking critically about the values embedded in design and the consequences for people, their behavior, and feelings.

 

ARCH 130 [Crysler]

Introduction to Architectural Design Theory and Criticism

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
  • Prerequisites: Open to upper division undergraduates.
  • Formerly 130A
  • Description: This class introduces students to the history and practice of design theory from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on developments of the last four decades. Readings and lectures explore specific constellations of theory and practice in relation to changing social and historical conditions. The course follows the rise of modernist design thinking, with particular emphasis on the growing influence of technical rationality across multiple fields in the post World War II period. Systematic approaches based in cybernetics and operations research (amongst others) are examined in the context of wider attempts to develop a science of design. Challenges to modernist design thinking, through advocacy planning and community-based design, the influence of social movements and countercultures, and parallel developments in postmodernism within and beyond architecture, provide the critical background for consideration of recent approaches to design theory, including those informed by developments in digital media and technology, environmental and ecological concerns, questions surrounding the globalization of architectural production, and the development of new materials.

Extended Course Description

Arch 130 provides an introduction to the ideas that have informed design thinking from the 19th century to the present, with an emphasis on the debates of the last four decades. The course explores significant changes in theory and practice across the design disciplines and professions (with particular emphasis on architecture), and considers how they are connected to larger social and historical forces. Students will be introduced to important tendencies in both critical reflection and design, and explore their interconnection through case studies of building, urban spaces and cities.

Readings and lectures situate debates about design theory at UC Berkeley in a broader national and international framework and explore the how past approaches continue to shape those that are influential today. Key issues extend from the role of industrialization in 19th century design thinking, through the rise of modernism and postmodernism, to recent issues surrounding digital technology, sustainability and globalization.

 

Arch 139.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units

Extended Course Description

"Spaces of Queer Theory"

This seminar will provide students with an introduction to the genealogy of queer theory and its relationship to architecture, urbanism and the built environment. The course will be divided into four major segments, roughly chronological in outline. In part one, we will examine scholarship that charts the changing relationship between sexuality and space from the 19th century through the first decades of the 20th century. This section of the course will provide students with an understanding of the interconnection between cities, sexuality the rise of the liberal nation-state, while also setting the stage for the subsequent sections of the class.  
In part two, we will examine the international emergence of gay and lesbian rights in the post WW2-period, tracing their development as liberation movements together with their spatial articulations at architectural and urban scales, into the post-Stonewall period. In part three, we will examine the urban transformation of sexual politics during the AIDS crisis and its aftermath, and consider the subsequent impact of post-9/11 geopolitical  forces on spaces of sexuality and citizenship within and beyond the US    . In the fourth part of the class, we will examine diverse forms of queer futurity: creative spaces of open-ended invention and change that move beyond the prior politics of identity and recognition to explore new intersections of space, embodiment and activist politics in the global present. 
 
Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to the changing theories and practices that have shaped debates around sexuality and space, ranging from research informed by sociology, critical and literary theory to poststructuralist philosophy. We will also explore how the spatial politics of gender and sexuality have developed in different ways globally. Our overarching concern will be with the constellation of debates around queer theory, as both a contingent form of identity and a framework for embodied practices of social epistemology. The following questions will animate the course discussions:

*How are material conditions, spatial practices and queer activisms connected, both historically and in the present? How can they be reimagined in response to the political questions of the contemporary moment, as they are shaped by issues such as rapid ecological change, intensifying        urban segregation, the demographic transformation of queer populations, through aging, migration, and other influences, such as ethno-nationalism?

*How can queer theory operate as both a challenge to, and opening for, pedagogy in the built environment disciplines? In what ways might the diverse epistemological standpoints and critical/creative practices associated with queer theory inform the rethinking of the institutions and practices of design education for the imagination of alternative futures? 


*How can we develop collaborative practices that forge new critical and creative directions within and across disciplines? How can queer theory foster invention and future imaginings that link theory and practice, academia and urban communities together in ways that are commensurate with contemporary cultural politics, both within and beyond the US? 

This course is open to graduate students and upper division undergraduates. With the goal of fostering truly interdisciplinary debates, the course welcomes students with interests in the intersection between queer issues, cities, architecture, and the built environment from across the Berkeley campus. 

 

Arch 142 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course Format:  1 hour Lecture / Seminar per week
  • This course must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis
  • 1 or 2 units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

ARCH 144 [Salter]  

Introduction to Acoustics

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: This course focuses on what architects need to know about acoustics. The first part deals with the fundamentals of acoustics including how sound levels are described and measured, and human response to sound. The course then covers building acoustics, mechanical equipment noise and vibration control, office acoustics, design of sound amplification systems, and environmental acoustics.

Extended Description

This is a five week "module" course. It will meet the first five weeks of the semester only.

 

ARCH 150 [Black] 

Introduction to Structures  

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and thirty hours of discussion per semester.
  • Prerequisites: Physics 8A.
  • Description: Study of forces, materials, and structural significance in the design of buildings. Emphasis on understanding the structural behavior of real building systems.

 

ARCH 170A [Shanken] 

An Historical Survey of Architecture and Urbanism

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and 15 hours of seminar/discussion per semester.
  • Description: The first part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval periods; the second part studies the period since 1400; the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their social and historical context.

Extended course description

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the history of the built environment from its beginnings to about 1500CE. The scope is broad in geographical, cultural, and architectural terms, combining architectural and urban history with anthropology, and geography. It is also an introduction to historical methods in architectural history. Students will learn a variety of ways to look at the history of buildings and cities while they learn both canonical monuments and less celebrated examples. Although the prime emphasis is on the Mediterranean basin, a substantial number of lectures will be devoted to architecture in Asia, Africa, and Meso-America. Students interested in history, art history, anthropology, archaeology, architecture, sociology, planning, material culture, cities, and urbanism will find it an excellent introduction to the subject, as well as to the humanities in general. Students from all departments and at all levels are welcome! Satisfies the general breadth requirement for Historical Studies and Arts and Literature..

 

Arch 179. 001 [Shanken] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units
  • Limited to interested undergraduates of any major

Extended Course description

"Writing on the Walls"

We all pass by ugly buildings everyday, often in silent, unconscious protest, or register beautiful ones fleetingly, alas, through a windshield. This turning away leaves us unprepared to judge, and more importantly, to demand better. Yet architecture is the most public of arts. We all use it everyday and this makes us all arbiters of it. This ART OF WRITING course aims to empower students to seek out their own critical voices in writing about their surroundings. It will help students sharpen their eye and to show them how to lay out plainly, but with sophistication, the ramifications of various kinds of interventions in the built environment. The campus will be the course's quarry. Students will tour Berkeley's buildings and landscape and read them against both architectural criticism and essays by authors such as John McPhee, John Updike, Christopher Hitchens, Sue Allison, Wendell Berry, and Patricia Hampl. 

 

Arch 179.002 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Two to Four units

Extended Course Description

"Utopias & Heterotopias"

his seminar is aimed at introducing two different ways of dealing with space. The first mode —utopian thought— has been around for long time and, at least since the “socialist utopians” of the industrial revolution, has been a key influence on urban design and planning. The first part of this course will focus on these attempts and on the influence that they still have on present days urban planning and design. Beginning with a discussion on the concept of utopia, the class will then look at the influence of utopian thought in several contemporary urban and planning case studies.
The second mode of thinking is suggested by the recent emergence of the concept of heterotopia. While utopias deal largely with physical space, this concept points at the existence of "other spaces" that coexist and overlap with the physical environment and create a multiple layering of spatial meanings, conflicts, and uses. Taking heterotopia as its starting point, in the second part of the seminar we'll discuss the characteristics of these social spaces and look for examples of it.

 

ARCH 198BC [Crawford]

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. (F,SP)

 

Graduate Level Classes

ARCH 200A [Staff] 

Introduction to Architecture Studio 1

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units

 

ARCH 200C [Staff]

Representational Practice in Architectural Design 

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Three units


ARCH 201 [Staff]

Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio 

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units

 

Arch 203 [Staff ]

Integrated Design Studio

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units


ARCH 204A [Staff] 

Thesis Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Three units

 

ARCH 205A [Schleicher] 

Studio One, Fall 

  • Course Format: Ten hours of studio per week
  • Five Units
  • Limited to students who have been admitted to the Studio One Program for academic year 2017 - 2018

Extended Course Description

"Bio-inspired Design & Fabrication"

Building on the positive experience of the previous year, Studio One 2017-18 will once again focus on the topic of Bio-inspired Design and Fabrication and thereby venture out into the unchartered territories between architecture, engineering, and biology. 

The main goal of the studio is to gain knowledge from the analysis of living systems to find solutions to problems, create new inventions and innovations, and transfer this knowledge to building and architectural systems. Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. The basic motivation behind the transfer of biological solutions to technical applications is the assumption that optimized biological structures have been developed in the course of 3,8 billion years of evolution that could also be significant and convincing in technical developments. Nature has numerous of “ingenious solutions” available that can often be understood intuitively. However, it is seldom easy to explain the underlying mechanism, and in particular to explain how these principles can be applied to technology. It is this discrepancy that makes the field of bio-inspired design and fabrication so relevant for the future. 

In order to shed light on this question, the studio seeks to forge new interdisciplinary alliances and cross-professional partnerships. Based on this framework, the studio will bridge the areas of biomimetics, computational design, structural analysis, material-based fabrication and construction. In studio, the students will follow an inquiry-oriented, experiment-based, and project-driven research agenda. Based on an intensive, critical, and analytical approach to cutting-edge design and construction methods, the studio aims to go one step further by taking inspiration from the flexible and resilient structures found in plants and insects. By closely investigating biological structures for their efficiency and adaptability as well as abstracting their underlying construction principles into suitable architectural systems, the studio will challenge our present understanding with new bio-inspired fabrication and construction concepts.

While in the first semester of the program, the students will mainly work individually and in small groups, the aim of the second semester is to join forces and push one idea into a bigger scale together. Over the course of the program, students will design and fabricate small-scale models, mid-sized prototypes, and large-scale demonstrators that showcase the potential of bio-inspired concepts and anticipate a new foundation for a lightweight, multifunctional, and sustainable architecture.


ARCH 207A [Pakravan] 

Architecture Lectures Colloquium

  • Course Format: One hour per week
  • One unit

 

ARCH 207C [Creedon] 

Professional Practice Colloquium  

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week
  • One unit

 

Arch 209.001 [Calott]

Special Topics in Archtictural Design

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Description

"Integrated Development, Architecture & Urbanism"

This course is a Primer interrogating the myriad development forces which produce our streets,neighborhoods, towns, cities and regions, as well as our global slums and blighted urban landscapes. Aspiring to empower design and planning professionals with greater agency to participate in the creation of urban places, the class will develop a critical understanding of development practices and their impact on social, economic and urban form. Sought through a broad understanding of fundamental real estate development processes and enterprises, students will be challenged to explore how the benefits of their design and planning expertise might be extended to more people, mitigate systemic urban problems, and to more effectively impact what type of urban environments we make. Seminar topics will attempt to demystify real estate development explored through a review of selected Case Studies and weekly lectures by the Instructor and invited design, planning and development industry professionals. This course will investigate how Development, Architecture and Urbanism are intertwined, contending that cities are our most sustainable resource, holding the key to our social, economic, and culturally equitable future, as well as our planet’s environmental stewardship.

This course will promote an interdisciplinary approach for design professionals and policy makers who collaborate together in the development of cities, designed to include Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, City & Regional Planning, and Law and Business graduate students.

 

Arch 219 [Cranz]

Special Topics in the Social & Cultural Basis of Design 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/ seminar per week

Extended Description

"Playground Design & the Giant Eye"

This seminar establishes the groundwork for a design-build studio in spring 2018 on playground design involving an interactive learning structure.  The Giant Eye is a model of the human visual pathway all the way to the brain that children (and adults) can move through in order to experience anatomy three-dimenionally. As a small building, it is also a sculpture, a contribution to the playground landscape, and at any scale it is a playful, engaging learning experience.  In the fall 2017 we will visit the site, make some basic decisions regarding scale and materials, review literature on playground theory, and directly experience EyeBody theory as developed by Peter Grunwald, EyeBody.  Students who take this seminar do not have to take the studio in the spring, and those who are unable to take the seminar are still eligible to take the studio in the spring, but this seminar will help the studio students be able to produce construction drawings by spring break, so that contraction can proceed on schedule.  Learning outcomes: foundations of playground theory, practical experience in site analysis, practical experience in interviewing clients, how the human visual system works.

 

Arch 229.001 [Caldas] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Virtual Reality: Concept and Representation"

Virtual Reality is progressively emerging as a particularly adequate medium not only to visualize architecture, but to design it too. The capacities that VR offers to experience space virtually may be the closest approximation to actual physical experience currently available to designers. But can this newly found capacity impact the process of design itself? This graduate seminar will engage in an open reflection and active experimentation on several dimensions of VR that may affect how we conceive and experience environments at design stage. Some of the topics to be explored include daylighting simulation and representation in virtual reality; linking parametric design and VR; modeling, representation and analysis of significant examples in recent architecture history; and 360 VR filming of relevant buildings. The seminar will use the equipment and resources included in the newly created VR Lab at Wurster Hall, and will explore potential connections both with the Center for Augmented Cognition and the VR Club at Berkeley.

 

Arch 239.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units

Extended Course Description

"Spaces of Queer Theory"

This seminar will provide students with an introduction to the genealogy of queer theory and its relationship to architecture, urbanism and the built environment. The course will be divided into four major segments, roughly chronological in outline. In part one, we will examine scholarship that charts the changing relationship between sexuality and space from the 19th century through the first decades of the 20th century. This section of the course will provide students with an understanding of the interconnection between cities, sexuality the rise of the liberal nation-state, while also setting the stage for the subsequent sections of the class.  
In part two, we will examine the international emergence of gay and lesbian rights in the post WW2-period, tracing their development as liberation movements together with their spatial articulations at architectural and urban scales, into the post-Stonewall period. In part three, we will examine the urban transformation of sexual politics during the AIDS crisis and its aftermath, and consider the subsequent impact of post-9/11 geopolitical  forces on spaces of sexuality and citizenship within and beyond the US    . In the fourth part of the class, we will examine diverse forms of queer futurity: creative spaces of open-ended invention and change that move beyond the prior politics of identity and recognition to explore new intersections of space, embodiment and activist politics in the global present. 
 
Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to the changing theories and practices that have shaped debates around sexuality and space, ranging from research informed by sociology, critical and literary theory to poststructuralist philosophy. We will also explore how the spatial politics of gender and sexuality have developed in different ways globally. Our overarching concern will be with the constellation of debates around queer theory, as both a contingent form of identity and a framework for embodied practices of social epistemology. The following questions will animate the course discussions:

*How are material conditions, spatial practices and queer activisms connected, both historically and in the present? How can they be reimagined in response to the political questions of the contemporary moment, as they are shaped by issues such as rapid ecological change, intensifying        urban segregation, the demographic transformation of queer populations, through aging, migration, and other influences, such as ethno-nationalism?

*How can queer theory operate as both a challenge to, and opening for, pedagogy in the built environment disciplines? In what ways might the diverse epistemological standpoints and critical/creative practices associated with queer theory inform the rethinking of the institutions and practices of design education for the imagination of alternative futures? 


*How can we develop collaborative practices that forge new critical and creative directions within and across disciplines? How can queer theory foster invention and future imaginings that link theory and practice, academia and urban communities together in ways that are commensurate with contemporary cultural politics, both within and beyond the US? 

This course is open to graduate students and upper division undergraduates. With the goal of fostering truly interdisciplinary debates, the course welcomes students with interests in the intersection between queer issues, cities, architecture, and the built environment from across the Berkeley campus. 

 

Arch 241 [Schiavon]

Research Methods in Building Science

  • Course format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Description

Research Methods in Building Science. Three hours of lecture/seminar per week. Prerequisites: Building Science MS/PhD, MArch, BA in Architecture and MS/PhD in Engineering students or consent of instructor. This interactive class provides training in research skills and critical thinking in the field of Building Science and Technology, with a focus on energy use, indoor environmental quality, and human well-being, comfort, and productivity. Readings will cover both building science theory and research methods, and classes will be organized around a series of individual and group homework. Topics will include literature review, the design of both lab-based and field experiments, physical measurements, post occupancy evaluation, statistical analysis and interpretation of data, data visualization and methods of enhancing the spread and impact of scientific results (Wikipedia editing and public presentations).  Throughout, we will discuss ways in which research can influence the design and operation of buildings, including through building standards and codes.  Depending on the status of students’ thesis work or research interest, there will be opportunities to develop your research plans with a specific focus on building science methodology. All graduate students with some knowledge of building science and an interest in related methods of inquiry are warmly welcomed. The main aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge and abilities to: 1) plan, develop, execute, interpret, and spread research in the building science/energy field; and 2) develop fact/data-based answers to design questions concerning impact of the built environment on humans, energy consumption, and sustainability.

 

Arch 242 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course format: One hour of lecture per week
  • One or two units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

ARCH 249. 002 [Salter]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings  

Extended Course Description

"Introduction to Acoustics"

This is a five week module class meeting the first five weeks of the semester.

 

Arch 259.001 [Schleicher]

SPECIAL TOPICS IN STRUCTURAL DESIGN

  • Course Format: Three Hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units
  • Enrollment only by permission of the instructor

Extended Course Description

"Flexible Hybrid Structures "

This class lies at the intersection of design, architecture, engineering, and computer science and aims to attract students from across the campus. In this interdisciplinary framework, students will explore the design possibilities that emerge from combining soft, flexible, and elastic materials with bespoke 3D-printed joinery.

The topics in this class will include a general introduction to bending-active structures and a special focus on hybrid systems that either combine different materials or take advantage of highly differentiated material characteristics. In small teams, students will investigate inspirational case studies of bending and folding principles in nature and technology and present the underlying mechanisms and possible range of applications to their colleagues in the class. Based on this knowledge, students will conduct physical experiments, which explore the idea of using large elastic deformations of initially straight or planar rods and plates in order to generate and stabilize geometrically complex shapes. In parallel to these physical experiments, students will also learn how to recreate their designs by using digital form-finding simulations. By synchronizing their hands-on tests with digital simulations, the students will be able to follow an iterative design process and explore the larger design space of flexible structures and mechanisms. 

.

ARCH 260 [Buntrock]

Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level  

  • Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

 

Arch 262 [Davids]

Architecture in Detail

  • Three hours of Seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

This seminar will reevaluate of the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture. Nowhere in architecture is bodily contact felt more readily than in realm of detail. Small when compared to a building’s overall mass, details should be considered the building’s basic genetic in-print determining not just the architecture’s
appearance but also its performance. Each detail contributes to the meaning of the whole and simultaneously represents a microcosm of the larger entity. For Le Corbusier this idea could be traced back to nature where the smallest cell determines the validity of the whole.
Through dedicated lectures by local practitioners, research, analysis, and interpretation of case studies and self generated design investigations we
will explore and understand formal and material innovation and the increasingly global nature of architectural practice; consultants, suppliers, and fabricators as well as the understanding of the critical role of computers in architecture. Finally we will also discuss the ethical dimension of detailing as the choice of materials and their combination has a potential impact on world resources, environments, and economy.

Structure
The course is structured in three parts:
1) Discussions of essays by scholars and practitioners an detailing, practice and materials
2) A series of lectures by Bay Area practitioners focused on detailing work in their practices
3)An  in depth case-study  of significant buildings focusing on design ethos of the architect practice , construction
technique, materials leading to the design and the making of  one 1: 1 detail intended to develop and advance your mown design work.

TASKS.
1)Weekly reading response Attendance and Participation in Discussions
You are required to prepare a brief response of three critical questions to all of the assigned readings of no more
than 150 words, which you may be asked to read aloud at the start of the class discussions each week. Your
response should not be a summary; rather it should present critical issues/questions the reading has raised for you.
You may also use it to suggest connections/conflicts with previous readings, or perhaps establish a link with work
you are doing in other courses. A copy of your response must be submitted at the beginning of each class. These
will form an integral part of the final grade you receive for class participation. Attendance is mandatory. Regular,
enthusiastic and informed participation in class discussions is an important part of your contribution to the class.

2)CASE Studies Leading to the construction of one detail:
Choose buildings case studies that are of interest to you and that will lead to the 1:1 design a detail it may be a different scale depending on the chosen detail).
    
.Focus on the different assemblies/materials
a) Give us a general context, site and climatic context
b) General architectural context of the architect work. Illustrate the building identify the detail’s location/s
c) Present the details in 11X14” sheets of paper (as many as necessary )presented horizontally. Include a graphic
scale.
d) Choose the case studies with some thesis or subject in mind; for example the staging of parts, de-mountability, ergonomics,
accessibility, economy, durability or serial applicability.

 

ARCH 270 [Castillo]

History of Modern Architecture 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar and one hour of dicussion per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Case Studies in Modern Architecture"

This survey of the “built discourses” of modern architecture reviews attempts to define modernity as a mode of design practice and a way of life. Through case studies of individual buildings, lectures examine developments in style, theory, graphic representation, construction technology and interior programming.

 

Arch 279.002 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Two to Four units

Extended Course Description.

"Utopias & Heterotopias"

his seminar is aimed at introducing two different ways of dealing with space. The first mode —utopian thought— has been around for long time and, at least since the “socialist utopians” of the industrial revolution, has been a key influence on urban design and planning. The first part of this course will focus on these attempts and on the influence that they still have on present days urban planning and design. Beginning with a discussion on the concept of utopia, the class will then look at the influence of utopian thought in several contemporary urban and planning case studies.
The second mode of thinking is suggested by the recent emergence of the concept of heterotopia. While utopias deal largely with physical space, this concept points at the existence of "other spaces" that coexist and overlap with the physical environment and create a multiple layering of spatial meanings, conflicts, and uses. Taking heterotopia as its starting point, in the second part of the seminar we'll discuss the characteristics of these social spaces and look for examples of it.

 

ARCH 299 [Staff] 

Individual Study and Research for Master's and Doctoral Students  


ARCH 602 [Staff] 

Individual Study for Doctoral Students 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
  • Selected topics in the history of architecture.
  • Three or four units.
    • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
    • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
    • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
    • Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
    • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
    • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
    • Description: Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
    • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
    • Credit option: 200C must be taken in conjunction with 200A.
    • Description: This course will address three distinct levels of representational practice in architectural design: 1) cultivate an understanding of the foundational discourse and diversity of approaches to architectural representation; 2) develop a fluency in the canonical methods found in architectural practice; 3) encourage the development of a personal relationship to forms of modeling and formats of drawing.
    • Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
    • Prerequisites: 100A-100B or 200A-200B.
    • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
    • Description: The design of buildings or communities of advanced complexity. Each section deals with a specific topic such as housing, public and institutional buildings, and local or international community development. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
    • Course format: Eight hours of studio per week
    • Description: the penultimate studio where students incorporate their accumulated knowledge into architectural solutions.
    • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
    • Description: Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.
    • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
    • Prerequisites: Consent of Chair or graduate advisors during fall semester.
    • Formerly 205
    • Description: This course is a one-year, post-professional design studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.
    • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
    • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
    • Description: This course accompanies the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the first in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. Students will attend all Wednesday evening lectures of the College of Environmental Design lecture series. Every third week, they will meet with the instructor for a one-hour discussion.
    • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
    • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
    • Description: This course accompanies the required comprehensive design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the third in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program.
    • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
    • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
    • Description: Special topics in architectural design
    • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
    • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
    • Description: Special topics in architectural design
    • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
    • Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher
    • Description: Special topics in architectural design
    • course format: Three hours of seminar per week
    • Grading option: Letter grade or Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory
    • Description: Taste is at work in the way we display our things as much as in the qualities of things themselves. A performance-oriented model of taste observes that objects fall into two broad categories: pragmatic (that support behavior) and symbolic (that identify a person). People visually organize these two categories of objects using both explicit and subconscious aesthetic rules to produce visually unified displays. Depending on how it is used, how it is placed in relation to other things, an object's meaning can vary. The display of taste is where objects take on--and shed--meanings, depending on how they are combined with one another. This seminar reviews the extensive body of 20th-century theory and empirical research on taste and considers the implications of theories about taste for design creation, design education, and for client-professional relations.
    • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
    • Grading Option: Letter Grade
    • Description: This seminar examines the relationship between technology and design philosophy in the work of architects through analysis of individual buildings within the cntext of the complete oeuvre and an examination of the architect's writings and lectures. The seminar poses the following questions: What is the role of technology in the design philosophy of the architect and how is this theoretical position established in the architect's writings, lectures, interviews? How is this position revealed through the work moves to the developing world? How is this position negotiated in the design and construction of an individual building? Is this a successful strategy for achieving technical performance? Is this a successful strategy for achieving a coherent theoretical statement? A series of lectures explores these questions in relation to the architect and a set of required readings introduces the work of the architect and explores the relationship between technology and design philosophy. Students choose one building to investigate in parallel with the methods and issues discussed in class. These studies are presented in class as completed and assembled for submission as a final project.
    • Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    • Prerequisites: None
    • Units: 4
    • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    • Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm.
    • (F,SP)
    •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
    •   (F,SP)
    • What is the object of ‘public-ness’? Is it the encounter with strangers on the street, or is it the arena of a community’s shared concerns? And who is the public? Can the public include everybody, or unavoidably public-ness is restrictive and implies discrimination?
    •  Does a space have to be publicly owned to be public? To what extent is a shopping mall, or a café, a public space? And when is a sidewalk, or a bridge, a significant public space?
    •  Is the internet a (virtual) space? If so, to what extent are social networks public spaces?
    •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
    •   (F,SP)
    •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
    •   (F,SP)
    • Course Format:  1 hour Lecture / Seminar per week
    • This course must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis
    • 1 or 2 units
    • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
    • Prerequisite: Arch 140 or equivalent (see instructor)
    • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week per semester
    • Course Format: Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    • Prerequisites: 140
    • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    • Description:
    •  Course Format: 1 hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
    •  Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    •  Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    •  Description: Topics include a general introduction to bending and folding principles in nature and technology, case studies of bent and folded structures from varies fields of application, hands-on physical experimentation and digital simulation of flexible and elastic structures and mechanism, an  introduction to the design of patterns and tessellations, and a screening for architectural implementations of compliant systems.
    • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
    • Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
    • Description: This course addresses the methods and materials of construction. While students will not be experts at the end of the semester, the course should give students the confidence to feel comfortable on a construction site or when designing a small building for a studio. The course will focus on four major territories: structural materials, building envelope, built elements such as stairs and cabinets, and costs, labor conditions, conventional practices, and the regulatory environments that control design.
    • Course Format: Three hours of Lecture / Seminar per week
    • Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor 
    • Description: This seminar will reevaluate the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture.
    • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
    • Description: This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or sometimes two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, critical building details, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other parallel works and the architect's overall body of work.
    • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
    • Selected topics in the history of architecture.
    • Three or four units.
    • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
    • Selected topics in the history of architecture.
    • Three units.
    •   Course Format:
    •   Credit option: May be repeated for credit up to unit limitation.
    •   Grading option: Sections 1-3 to be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Sections 4-10 to be graded on a letter grade basis.
    •   Description: Special group studies on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.
    •   Course Format:
    •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
    •   Description: Individual studies including reading and individual research under the supervision of a faculty adviser and designed to reinforce the student's background in areas related to the proposed degree.
       
    • Course Format:
    • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
    • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
    • Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. This course may not be used for units or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.