ARCHITECTURE

ARCH Fall 2017 Courses

Below are currently offered courses for the fall 2017 semester. For any other course information, see the UC Berkeley Online Schedule of Classes.

Lower and Upper Division Courses

 

Arch 11A [Fields]

Introduction to Visual Representation and Drawing

Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.

Prerequisites: Env Des 1 with C- or better.

Description: (Formerly Env Des 11A) Introductory studio course: theories of representation and the use of several visual means, including freehand drawing and digital media, to analyze and convey ideas regarding the environment. Topics include contour, scale, perspective, color, tone, texture, and design.

 

ARCH 98BC [Crawford] 

 

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. (F,SP)

 

ARCH100A [Iwamoto] 

Fundamentals of Architectural Design

  • Course Format: Two hours of lecture, six hours of studio, and two hours of computer graphics laboratory per week.
  • Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken in sequence.
  • Description: Introductory courses in the design of buildings. Problems emphasize conceptual strategies of form and space, site relationships and social, technological and environmental determinants.
  • 100A focuses on the conceptual design process.
  • 100B stresses tectonics, materials, and energy considerations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings and field trips. (F,SP)

 

ARCH 100C [Staff] 

Architectural Design III

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
  • Description: This is a studio course in architectural design. Students work on individual and group design projects that build on topics from Architecture 100B with additional integration of conditions pertinent to architectural production that may include architectural precedents, context, landscape and urban issues, envelope, performance, structure, and tectonics in the design of buildings.
  • There are five studio sections each with its own project.
  • Eligible students should enroll in Arch 100C, Sec 001 and participate in the lottery after the faculty studio presentations to determine which section to enroll.

 

ARCH 102A [Staff]  

Capstone Project Preparation Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
  • Prerequisites: Architecture 100A, Architecture 100B.
  • Description: This course is a course in architectural research methods with an emphasis on collaborative work. Students will work on individual facets of a collective topic of critical importance to the contemporary discipline of architecture within areas of faculty expertise. These include: architectural history and theory, structures, materials and methods of construction, building performance, energy and environment, and social factors and human behavior in architecture and the environment. The goal of Capstone Preparation is to develop a coherent research proposal that will be used as a topic for the Capstone Project course taken the following semester. 

Extended Course Description

Coming soon

 

Arch 110AC [Cranz]

The Social and Cultural Basis of Design

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/forum and one hour of discussion per week.
  • Description: This course focuses on the significance of the physical environment for citizens and future design professionals. This course is an introduction to the field of human-environment studies, taught from an American Cultures perspective. Its objectives include: 1) being able to use the concepts in person-environment relations, 2) understanding how these concepts vary by subculture, primarily Anglo-, Hispanic-, and Chinese-American, 3) learning to use the methodological skills needed to conduct architectural programming and evaluation research, 4) thinking critically about the values embedded in design and the consequences for people, their behavior, and feelings.

 

Arch 129 [Choksombatchai]

Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week
  • Description: Topics cover advanced and research-related issues in digital design and New Media, related to architecture. For current offerings, see department website. 

Extended Course Description

This seminar focuses on video media and filmic mode of representation, Emerged at the turn of the nineteenth century as an unprecedented means of capturing time, cinema, at its best, attempts to delineate “time” -- makes visible or comprehensible “temporal dimension.”  According to Bergson, “time, identified as duration in the impetus given to consciousness by sensation, links the past, present, and future in a seamless continuum”1. WIthin cinematic space, this temporal scale is manifested as “material duration” where its formal and narrative structure together with light form the “architecture (as re-presentation and manifestation) of time.”

From the perspective of a maker (a producer of space), this seminar will explore film and video media as modes of re-examinations and fabrication of temporal scale in architecture. Through both comparative and directed study, we will  attempt  to  utilize  film/video  media  and  their  inherent  methods  together  with  architectural  conventions;  i.e. diagrams and orthographic projections, as measuring / computation devises to calibrate form and space in building design.

Within the context of this study, we will acknowledge the critical differences in the tectonic nature of architecture and film media. Through a series of film as case studies each week, we will critically investigate specific theoretical, structural, and technological constraints inherent to each medium. Another underlying objective of the seminar is to investigate the relationship of space and time as both cultural and phenomenological construct. Particularly, the proliferation and advancement of information technology, the effects of globalization and cross-breeding of ideas, as they rapidly and perpetually re-defined our shifting perception of space and time.

 

ARCH 130 [Crysler]

Introduction to Architectural Design Theory and Criticism

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
  • Prerequisites: Open to upper division undergraduates.
  • Formerly 130A
  • Description: This class introduces students to the history and practice of design theory from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on developments of the last four decades. Readings and lectures explore specific constellations of theory and practice in relation to changing social and historical conditions. The course follows the rise of modernist design thinking, with particular emphasis on the growing influence of technical rationality across multiple fields in the post World War II period. Systematic approaches based in cybernetics and operations research (amongst others) are examined in the context of wider attempts to develop a science of design. Challenges to modernist design thinking, through advocacy planning and community-based design, the influence of social movements and countercultures, and parallel developments in postmodernism within and beyond architecture, provide the critical background for consideration of recent approaches to design theory, including those informed by developments in digital media and technology, environmental and ecological concerns, questions surrounding the globalization of architectural production, and the development of new materials.

Extended Course Description

Arch 130 provides an introduction to the ideas that have informed design thinking from the 19th century to the present, with an emphasis on the debates of the last four decades. The course explores significant changes in theory and practice across the design disciplines and professions (with particular emphasis on architecture), and considers how they are connected to larger social and historical forces. Students will be introduced to important tendencies in both critical reflection and design, and explore their interconnection through case studies of building, urban spaces and cities.

Readings and lectures situate debates about design theory at UC Berkeley in a broader national and international framework and explore the how past approaches continue to shape those that are influential today. Key issues extend from the role of industrialization in 19th century design thinking, through the rise of modernism and postmodernism, to recent issues surrounding digital technology, sustainability and globalization.

 

Arch 139.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units

Extended Course Description

"Design & Diffrence: Spaces of Queer Theory"


This seminar examines the relationship between space, power and identity through recent arguments around queer theory and the politics of cultural difference. Over the last two decades queer theory has undergone a series of shifts and transformations, as challenges to heteronormativity and the institutional production of gendered and sexed identities have been enriched by intersecting considerations of class, race, religion, nationhood, ecology and economy, amongst others. This seminar will provide a cross-disciplinary introduction to these debates, while also considering the urban and architectural contexts in which identities are produced, lived and transformed. Readings and discussions are organized  around a sequence of thematic sections, each two weeks in length. In the first week of each theme, we will consider specific embodiments of queer theory; in the second, we will explore the mediating role of space in the formation of identities, through case studies at scales extending from the domestic interior to the transnational territory: 

Part I: thresholds: Spaces of queer theory  

Part II: transsections: Transgender histories and architectures 

Part III: dis/embodiments: Queering disability: Rethinking “standards” and universal design 

Part IV: visibilities: Queer visibilities: Pinkwashing, gentrification, and activism 

Part V: un/natures Queer ecologies: Unnatural subjects and the urban/rural divide. 

Part VI: queer necropolitics: The carceral city and LGBTQ abolition movements 

Conclusion: futurities: Activism and queer spaces of political imagination

The course is open to graduate students (Arch 239) and upper division undergraduates (Arch 139). Students of all academic disciplines, orientations and identities are welcome to take part. Course requirements include weekly reading responses, a class presentation and a creative/research project.

 

Arch 142 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course Format:  1 hour Lecture / Seminar per week
  • This course must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis
  • 1 or 2 units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

ARCH 144 [Salter]  

Introduction to Acoustics

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: This course focuses on what architects need to know about acoustics. The first part deals with the fundamentals of acoustics including how sound levels are described and measured, and human response to sound. The course then covers building acoustics, mechanical equipment noise and vibration control, office acoustics, design of sound amplification systems, and environmental acoustics.

Extended Description

This is a five week "module" course. It will meet the first five weeks of the semester only.

 

ARCH 149.001 [Diamond]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings

Extended Course Description

"Healthy Buildings"

This is a five week module class And will run from 29 Sept to 27 Oct 2017

The UN Declaration on Human Rights states, “healthyenvironments are a human right”. But what are healthy environments, and how do we design healthy environments for all and know that they are working as intended? This course will look at the elements of healthy environments, including physical characteristics such as indoor air quality, lighting, materials, as well as psychological and sociological characteristics of comfort, privacy, and control. Lectures and case studies will look at a range of building types, such as student apartments, housing for the elderly, schools, workplaces, and communities. Students will have readings, short in-class assignments, homework, and one project.

 

ARCH 150 [Black] 

Introduction to Structures  

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and thirty hours of discussion per semester.
  • Prerequisites: Physics 8A.
  • Description: Study of forces, materials, and structural significance in the design of buildings. Emphasis on understanding the structural behavior of real building systems.

 

ARCH 170A [Shanken] 

An Historical Survey of Architecture and Urbanism

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and 15 hours of seminar/discussion per semester.
  • Description: The first part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval periods; the second part studies the period since 1400; the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their social and historical context.

Extended course description

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the history of the built environment from its beginnings to about 1500CE. The scope is broad in geographical, cultural, and architectural terms, combining architectural and urban history with anthropology, and geography. It is also an introduction to historical methods in architectural history. Students will learn a variety of ways to look at the history of buildings and cities while they learn both canonical monuments and less celebrated examples. Although the prime emphasis is on the Mediterranean basin, a substantial number of lectures will be devoted to architecture in Asia, Africa, and Meso-America. Students interested in history, art history, anthropology, archaeology, architecture, sociology, planning, material culture, cities, and urbanism will find it an excellent introduction to the subject, as well as to the humanities in general. Students from all departments and at all levels are welcome! Satisfies the general breadth requirement for Historical Studies and Arts and Literature..

 

Arch 179. 001 [Shanken] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units
  • Limited to interested undergraduates of any major

Extended Course description

"Writing on the Walls"

We all pass by ugly buildings everyday, often in silent, unconscious protest, or register beautiful ones fleetingly, alas, through a windshield. This turning away leaves us unprepared to judge, and more importantly, to demand better. Yet architecture is the most public of arts. We all use it everyday and this makes us all arbiters of it. This ART OF WRITING course aims to empower students to seek out their own critical voices in writing about their surroundings. It will help students sharpen their eye and to show them how to lay out plainly, but with sophistication, the ramifications of various kinds of interventions in the built environment. The campus will be the course's quarry. Students will tour Berkeley's buildings and landscape and read them against both architectural criticism and essays by authors such as John McPhee, John Updike, Christopher Hitchens, Sue Allison, Wendell Berry, and Patricia Hampl. 

 

Arch 179.002 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Two to Four units

Extended Course Description

"Utopias & Heterotopias"

his seminar is aimed at introducing two different ways of dealing with space. The first mode —utopian thought— has been around for long time and, at least since the “socialist utopians” of the industrial revolution, has been a key influence on urban design and planning. The first part of this course will focus on these attempts and on the influence that they still have on present days urban planning and design. Beginning with a discussion on the concept of utopia, the class will then look at the influence of utopian thought in several contemporary urban and planning case studies.
The second mode of thinking is suggested by the recent emergence of the concept of heterotopia. While utopias deal largely with physical space, this concept points at the existence of "other spaces" that coexist and overlap with the physical environment and create a multiple layering of spatial meanings, conflicts, and uses. Taking heterotopia as its starting point, in the second part of the seminar we'll discuss the characteristics of these social spaces and look for examples of it.

 

Arch 179.003 [Crawford]

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"California Architecture"

Many California architects came from other places: Maybeck from New York via the  Ecole Des Beaux Arts; Schindler and Neutra from Vienna; Frank Gehry from Chicago. But, once they arrived, their encounters with the Golden State produced new and original forms of architecture. This seminar will examine the qualities of the state’s environment, culture, economy, and population that have produced unique buildings and landscapes during the 20th century. We will look at both Northern and Southern California, starting with canonical designers then moving beyond them to consider lesser-known regional architects whose work embodies local characteristics. We will base our investigations on existing research but even more on direct experience of buildings and an understanding of their capacity to respond to regional considerations such as history, climate, landscape and culture. The course is organized around lectures, discussion of the readings and student presentations

 

 

ARCH 198BC [Crawford]

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. (F,SP)

 

Graduate Level Classes

ARCH 200A [Staff] 

Introduction to Architecture Studio 1

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units

 

ARCH 200C [Staff]

Representational Practice in Architectural Design 

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Three units


ARCH 201 [Staff]

Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio 

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units

 

Arch 203 [Staff ]

Integrated Design Studio

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Five units


ARCH 204A [Staff] 

Thesis Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Three units

 

ARCH 205A [Schleicher] 

Studio One, Fall 

  • Course Format: Ten hours of studio per week
  • Five Units
  • Limited to students who have been admitted to the Studio One Program for academic year 2017 - 2018

Extended Course Description

"Bio-inspired Design & Fabrication"

Building on the positive experience of the previous year, Studio One 2017-18 will once again focus on the topic of Bio-inspired Design and Fabrication and thereby venture out into the unchartered territories between architecture, engineering, and biology. 

The main goal of the studio is to gain knowledge from the analysis of living systems to find solutions to problems, create new inventions and innovations, and transfer this knowledge to building and architectural systems. Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. The basic motivation behind the transfer of biological solutions to technical applications is the assumption that optimized biological structures have been developed in the course of 3,8 billion years of evolution that could also be significant and convincing in technical developments. Nature has numerous of “ingenious solutions” available that can often be understood intuitively. However, it is seldom easy to explain the underlying mechanism, and in particular to explain how these principles can be applied to technology. It is this discrepancy that makes the field of bio-inspired design and fabrication so relevant for the future. 

In order to shed light on this question, the studio seeks to forge new interdisciplinary alliances and cross-professional partnerships. Based on this framework, the studio will bridge the areas of biomimetics, computational design, structural analysis, material-based fabrication and construction. In studio, the students will follow an inquiry-oriented, experiment-based, and project-driven research agenda. Based on an intensive, critical, and analytical approach to cutting-edge design and construction methods, the studio aims to go one step further by taking inspiration from the flexible and resilient structures found in plants and insects. By closely investigating biological structures for their efficiency and adaptability as well as abstracting their underlying construction principles into suitable architectural systems, the studio will challenge our present understanding with new bio-inspired fabrication and construction concepts.

While in the first semester of the program, the students will mainly work individually and in small groups, the aim of the second semester is to join forces and push one idea into a bigger scale together. Over the course of the program, students will design and fabricate small-scale models, mid-sized prototypes, and large-scale demonstrators that showcase the potential of bio-inspired concepts and anticipate a new foundation for a lightweight, multifunctional, and sustainable architecture.


ARCH 207A [Pries] 

Architecture Lectures Colloquium

  • Course Format: One hour per week
  • One unit

 

ARCH 207C [Creedon] 

Professional Practice Colloquium  

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week
  • One unit

 

Arch 209.001 [Calott]

Special Topics in Archtictural Design

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Description

"Integrated Development, Architecture & Urbanism"

This course is a Primer interrogating the myriad development forces which produce our streets,neighborhoods, towns, cities and regions, as well as our global slums and blighted urban landscapes. Aspiring to empower design and planning professionals with greater agency to participate in the creation of urban places, the class will develop a critical understanding of development practices and their impact on social, economic and urban form. Sought through a broad understanding of fundamental real estate development processes and enterprises, students will be challenged to explore how the benefits of their design and planning expertise might be extended to more people, mitigate systemic urban problems, and to more effectively impact what type of urban environments we make. Seminar topics will attempt to demystify real estate development explored through a review of selected Case Studies and weekly lectures by the Instructor and invited design, planning and development industry professionals. This course will investigate how Development, Architecture and Urbanism are intertwined, contending that cities are our most sustainable resource, holding the key to our social, economic, and culturally equitable future, as well as our planet’s environmental stewardship.

This course will promote an interdisciplinary approach for design professionals and policy makers who collaborate together in the development of cities, designed to include Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, City & Regional Planning, and Law and Business graduate students.

 

Arch 209.002 [Gitai]

Special Topics in Archtictural Design

  • Course Format: two hours of lecture / seminar per week for five weeks
  • One Unit

Extended Description
"Narrative & Form: Cinema & Architecture"

The seminar will include a group of sessions in which the students will be exposed to different films that are in particular interest to the relationship between narrative and space. We will ask the reverse question: how can one describe space, architecture via the vehicle of cinematic image (how was Antonoini’s cinema a promoter of modernity in Italy di-associating himself from the romantic/nostalgic of the Italian landscape.

We will be presenting the four chapters of John Berger’s Ways of Seeing in which he is looking at forms of pictorial representations. We will challenge the students to choose a venue in Berkeley/Oakland and conclude the seminar by creating a short film that will represent some of the paradigms elaborated in the seminar.

Different films from Gitai’s work, Kadosh, Kippur, Lullaby to my father based on his Bauhaus- trained father and from his series on architecture will also be presented.

Amos Gitai is an acclaimed Israeli filmmaker, widely known for making documentaries and feature films, surrounding the Middle East and Jewish-Arab conflict.

Gitai's work was presented in several major retrospective in Pompidou Center Paris, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) New-York, the Lincoln Center New-York and the British Film Institute London. To date Gitai has created over 90 works of art over 38 years. Between 1999 and 2011 seven of his films were entered in the Cannes Film Festival for the Palme d'Or as well as the Venice Film Festival for the Golden Lion award. He received several prestigious prizes, in particular the Leopard of Honor at the Locarno International Film Festival (2008), the Roberto Rossellini prize (2005), the Robert Bresson prize (2013) and the Paradjanov prize (2014). His recent feature film, Rabin, The Last Day, was presented at the 72th Venice Film Festival.

 

Arch 219 [Cranz]

Special Topics in the Social & Cultural Basis of Design 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/ seminar per week
  • Three units
  • This section of Arch 219 meets the elective requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities 

Extended Description

"Playground Design & the Giant Eye"

This seminar establishes the groundwork for a design-build studio in spring 2018 on playground design involving an interactive learning structure.  The Giant Eye is a model of the human visual pathway all the way to the brain that children (and adults) can move through in order to experience anatomy three-dimenionally. As a small building, it is also a sculpture, a contribution to the playground landscape, and at any scale it is a playful, engaging learning experience.  In the fall 2017 we will visit the site, make some basic decisions regarding scale and materials, review literature on playground theory, and directly experience EyeBody theory as developed by Peter Grunwald, EyeBody.  Students who take this seminar do not have to take the studio in the spring, and those who are unable to take the seminar are still eligible to take the studio in the spring, but this seminar will help the studio students be able to produce construction drawings by spring break, so that contraction can proceed on schedule.  Learning outcomes: foundations of playground theory, practical experience in site analysis, practical experience in interviewing clients, how the human visual system works.

 

Arch 229.001 [Caldas] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Virtual Reality: Concept and Representation"

Virtual Reality is progressively emerging as a particularly adequate medium not only to visualize architecture, but to design it too. The capacities that VR offers to experience space virtually may be the closest approximation to actual physical experience currently available to designers. But can this newly found capacity impact the process of design itself? This graduate seminar will engage in an open reflection and active experimentation on several dimensions of VR that may affect how we conceive and experience environments at design stage. Some of the topics to be explored include daylighting simulation and representation in virtual reality; linking parametric design and VR; modeling, representation and analysis of significant examples in recent architecture history; and 360 VR filming of relevant buildings. The seminar will use the equipment and resources included in the newly created VR Lab at Wurster Hall, and will explore potential connections both with the Center for Augmented Cognition and the VR Club at Berkeley.

 

Arch 229.002 [de Monchaux] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Drawing on the City"

 We will build as much urban fabric in the next forty years as we have in all the previous 10,000 years of human history.  At this same time, we collect more detailed, specific information every seventy-two hours than we did in all of human history until 2007. This information is digital, increasingly spatialized, and substantially urban in its character. Yet data is not knowledge. This radical quantitative increase in the amount of urban fabric is inseparable from a radical qualitative increase in the nature of human uncertainty. This is due to the inherent unpredictability around the effects that unprecedented anthropogenic change in our climate and global ecology will have on our natural and built environments.

 As part of ced’s participation in the San Francisco Bay Area Resilient by Design Challenge (www.resilientbayarea.org,) students in this seminar will learn and deploy a range of techniques in site analysis and representation. This effort will be supported by collaboration with other partners in the CED’s team, including Aecom, CCA, CMG Landscape Architects, Silvestrum, Skeo and IDEO. 

Preparing the Bay Area for the effects of climate change will involve preparing for, and managing, the certain uncertainties of climate change and sea level rise. And any problem in uncertainty is always already a problem of representation.  For architect and planners, who draw what would otherwise be unseen or unforeseen—that is, both existing conditions and proposed constructions—this is especially true. The construction and consideration of this new urban fabric will have to be imagined and represented in powerfully adaptive ways. Such techniques will draw on the best traditions of urban representation even as they also inaugurate speculative, innovative, and instrumental proposals for imagining cities in time and space—all subject to the radical contingency of uncertain circumstances.TTherefore, thus course is dedicated to research at the intersection of data, the city, and drawing. As such, it involves a combination of practices — research, reading, representation and technique – often encountered separately, yet whose combination and synthesis is essential to understanding the limits and possibilities of contemporary urban representation.

The course is divided into three four-week modules, each of which deals with specific technologies, techniques, and conceptual approaches around drawing the city; mapping, drawing, and their graphic synthesis. Each module will contain a combination of critical and historical reading, precedent studies, software workshops, and the production/revision of drawings. The course is open to students with all levels of experience and from all backgrounds by interview with the instructor.

 

 

Arch 229.003 [Choksombatchai]

Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week
  • Description: Topics cover advanced and research-related issues in digital design and New Media, related to architecture. For current offerings, see department website. 

Extended Course Description

This seminar focuses on video media and filmic mode of representation, Emerged at the turn of the nineteenth century as an unprecedented means of capturing time, cinema, at its best, attempts to delineate “time” -- makes visible or comprehensible “temporal dimension.”  According to Bergson, “time, identified as duration in the impetus given to consciousness by sensation, links the past, present, and future in a seamless continuum”1. WIthin cinematic space, this temporal scale is manifested as “material duration” where its formal and narrative structure together with light form the “architecture (as re-presentation and manifestation) of time.”

From the perspective of a maker (a producer of space), this seminar will explore film and video media as modes of re-examinations and fabrication of temporal scale in architecture. Through both comparative and directed study, we will  attempt  to  utilize  film/video  media  and  their  inherent  methods  together  with  architectural  conventions;  i.e. diagrams and orthographic projections, as measuring / computation devises to calibrate form and space in building design.

Within the context of this study, we will acknowledge the critical differences in the tectonic nature of architecture and film media. Through a series of film as case studies each week, we will critically investigate specific theoretical, structural, and technological constraints inherent to each medium. Another underlying objective of the seminar is to investigate the relationship of space and time as both cultural and phenomenological construct. Particularly, the proliferation and advancement of information technology, the effects of globalization and cross-breeding of ideas, as they rapidly and perpetually re-defined our shifting perception of space and time.

 

Arch 239.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architectural Theory

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units
  • This section of Arch 239 meets the elective requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities 

Extended Course Description

"Design and Difference: Spaces of Queer Theory"

This seminar examines the relationship between space, power and identity through recent arguments around queer theory and the politics of cultural difference. Over the last two decades queer theory has undergone a series of shifts and transformations, as challenges to heteronormativity and the institutional production of gendered and sexed identities have been enriched by intersecting considerations of class, race, religion, nationhood, ecology and economy, amongst others. This seminar will provide a cross-disciplinary introduction to these debates, while also considering the urban and architectural contexts in which identities are produced, lived and transformed. Readings and discussions are organized  around a sequence of thematic sections, each two weeks in length. In the first week of each theme, we will consider specific embodiments of queer theory; in the second, we will explore the mediating role of space in the formation of identities, through case studies at scales extending from the domestic interior to the transnational territory: 

Part I: thresholds: Spaces of queer theory  

Part II: transsections: Transgender histories and architectures 

Part III: dis/embodiments: Queering disability: Rethinking “standards” and universal design 

Part IV: visibilities: Queer visibilities: Pinkwashing, gentrification, and activism 

Part V: un/natures Queer ecologies: Unnatural subjects and the urban/rural divide. 

Part VI: queer necropolitics: The carceral city and LGBTQ abolition movements 

Conclusion: futurities: Activism and queer spaces of political imagination

The course is open to graduate students (Arch 239) and upper division undergraduates (Arch 139). Students of all academic disciplines, orientations and identities are welcome to take part. Course requirements include weekly reading responses, a class presentation and a creative/research project.

 

Arch 241 [Schiavon]

Research Methods in Building Science

  • Course format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Description

Research Methods in Building Science. Three hours of lecture/seminar per week. Prerequisites: Building Science MS/PhD, MArch, BA in Architecture and MS/PhD in Engineering students or consent of instructor. This interactive class provides training in research skills and critical thinking in the field of Building Science and Technology, with a focus on energy use, indoor environmental quality, and human well-being, comfort, and productivity. Readings will cover both building science theory and research methods, and classes will be organized around a series of individual and group homework. Topics will include literature review, the design of both lab-based and field experiments, physical measurements, post occupancy evaluation, statistical analysis and interpretation of data, data visualization and methods of enhancing the spread and impact of scientific results (Wikipedia editing and public presentations).  Throughout, we will discuss ways in which research can influence the design and operation of buildings, including through building standards and codes.  Depending on the status of students’ thesis work or research interest, there will be opportunities to develop your research plans with a specific focus on building science methodology. All graduate students with some knowledge of building science and an interest in related methods of inquiry are warmly welcomed. The main aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge and abilities to: 1) plan, develop, execute, interpret, and spread research in the building science/energy field; and 2) develop fact/data-based answers to design questions concerning impact of the built environment on humans, energy consumption, and sustainability.

 

Arch 242 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course format: One hour of lecture per week
  • One or two units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

ARCH 249.002 [Salter]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings

  • Course Format: Three Hours of lecture / seminar per week for five weeks
  • One unit

Extended Course Description

"Introduction to Acoustics"

This is a five week module class and will run from 25 August through 29 September 2017.

 

ARCH 249.004 [Diamond]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings  

  • Course Format: Three Hours of lecture / seminar per week for five weeks
  • One unit

Extended Course Description

"Healthy Buildings"

This is a five week module class And will run from 29 Sept through 27 October 2017

The UN Declaration on Human Rights states, “healthyenvironments are a human right”. But what are healthy environments, and how do we design healthy environments for all and know that they are working as intended? This course will look at the elements of healthy environments, including physical characteristics such as indoor air quality, lighting, materials, as well as psychological and sociological characteristics of comfort, privacy, and control. Lectures and case studies will look at a range of building types, such as student apartments, housing for the elderly, schools, workplaces, and communities. Students will have readings, short in-class assignments, homework, and one project.

 

ARCH 249.005 [Ghahramani]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings  

  • Course Format: Three Hours of lecture / seminar per week for five weeks
  • One unit

Extended Course Description

"Data Science for the Built Environment"

This is a five week module class And will run from 3 Novemberr to 1 December 2017

With the rapid growth of the application of sensing technologies and automation devices in the built environments, the management of these data streams and extracting valuable information has become a challenging task. This course provides an introduction to data management systems such as  elational databases and filtering methods and focuses on supervised and unsupervised machine learning methods with applications to the built environments. This class also focuses on practical and effective applications of a wide range of data mining and machine learning techniques to a variety of real-world problems in the field of the design and operation of buildings.

 

Arch 259.001 [Schleicher]

SPECIAL TOPICS IN STRUCTURAL DESIGN

  • Course Format: Three Hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units
  • Enrollment only by permission of the instructor
Arch 259 - Fall 2017 -- Hybird structures - Schleicher

Extended Course Description

"Flexible Hybrid Structures "

This class lies at the intersection of design, architecture, engineering, and computer science and aims to attract students from across the campus. In this interdisciplinary framework, students will explore the design possibilities that emerge from combining soft, flexible, and elastic materials with bespoke 3D-printed joinery.

The topics in this class will include a general introduction to bending-active structures and a special focus on hybrid systems that either combine different materials or take advantage of highly differentiated material characteristics. In small teams, students will investigate inspirational case studies of bending and folding principles in nature and technology and present the underlying mechanisms and possible range of applications to their colleagues in the class. Based on this knowledge, students will conduct physical experiments, which explore the idea of using large elastic deformations of initially straight or planar rods and plates in order to generate and stabilize geometrically complex shapes. In parallel to these physical experiments, students will also learn how to recreate their designs by using digital form-finding simulations. By synchronizing their hands-on tests with digital simulations, the students will be able to follow an iterative design process and explore the larger design space of flexible structures and mechanisms. 

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ARCH 260 [Buntrock]

Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level  

  • Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

 

Arch 262 [Davids]

Architecture in Detail

  • Three hours of Seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

This seminar will reevaluate of the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture. Nowhere in architecture is bodily contact felt more readily than in realm of detail. Small when compared to a building’s overall mass, details should be considered the building’s basic genetic in-print determining not just the architecture’s
appearance but also its performance. Each detail contributes to the meaning of the whole and simultaneously represents a microcosm of the larger entity. For Le Corbusier this idea could be traced back to nature where the smallest cell determines the validity of the whole.
Through dedicated lectures by local practitioners, research, analysis, and interpretation of case studies and self generated design investigations we
will explore and understand formal and material innovation and the increasingly global nature of architectural practice; consultants, suppliers, and fabricators as well as the understanding of the critical role of computers in architecture. Finally we will also discuss the ethical dimension of detailing as the choice of materials and their combination has a potential impact on world resources, environments, and economy.

Structure
The course is structured in three parts:
1) Discussions of essays by scholars and practitioners an detailing, practice and materials
2) A series of lectures by Bay Area practitioners focused on detailing work in their practices
3)An  in depth case-study  of significant buildings focusing on design ethos of the architect practice , construction
technique, materials leading to the design and the making of  one 1: 1 detail intended to develop and advance your mown design work.

TASKS.
1)Weekly reading response Attendance and Participation in Discussions
You are required to prepare a brief response of three critical questions to all of the assigned readings of no more
than 150 words, which you may be asked to read aloud at the start of the class discussions each week. Your
response should not be a summary; rather it should present critical issues/questions the reading has raised for you.
You may also use it to suggest connections/conflicts with previous readings, or perhaps establish a link with work
you are doing in other courses. A copy of your response must be submitted at the beginning of each class. These
will form an integral part of the final grade you receive for class participation. Attendance is mandatory. Regular,
enthusiastic and informed participation in class discussions is an important part of your contribution to the class.

2)CASE Studies Leading to the construction of one detail:
Choose buildings case studies that are of interest to you and that will lead to the 1:1 design a detail it may be a different scale depending on the chosen detail).
    
.Focus on the different assemblies/materials
a) Give us a general context, site and climatic context
b) General architectural context of the architect work. Illustrate the building identify the detail’s location/s
c) Present the details in 11X14” sheets of paper (as many as necessary )presented horizontally. Include a graphic
scale.
d) Choose the case studies with some thesis or subject in mind; for example the staging of parts, de-mountability, ergonomics,
accessibility, economy, durability or serial applicability.

 

Arch 264 [Buntrock]

Off-Site Fabrication: Opportunities & Evils

  • 4 hours of seminar per week for ten weeks
  • 3 units
  • Prerequsites: Arch 260 or 160 or Equivalent or on consent of the instructor

This seminar looks at the implications of off-site fabrication in architecture: consistent, protected environments; worker efficiency and safety; coordination of trades; cheaper, semi-skilled labor; construction periods shortened; and completion dates more predictable. Off-site fabrication can allow for increased refinement and trial assemblies. However, it may also create monotonous sameness when the processes and results are not considered with care. 

Extended Course Description

Prerequisites: 160/ 260 Introduction to Construction or consent of instructor. 

This seminar looks at the implications of off-site fabrication in architecture: consistent, protected environments; worker efficiency and safety; coordination of trades; cheaper, semi-skilled labor; construction periods shortened; and completion dates more predictable. Off-site fabrication can allow for increased refinement and trial assemblies. However, it may also create monotonous sameness when the processes and results are not considered with care.

This seminar will take a closer look at the implications of off-site fabrication in architectural production. It will move through three steps: in the initial weeks, we will look at precedents for off-site fabrication in architecture and construction, establishing an intellectual framework for subsequent work. Following this, we will look more closely at some common opportunities for off-site fabrication today. Finally, students will present their own research on local fabrication opportunities. This research will include a detailed report on fabrication opportunities, based on your interviews with architects and fabricators.

During the course of the semester, readings and visits to fabricators should allow sufficient opportunity for everyone to develop a clear sense of the way off-site fabrication fits into architectural production. I hope we will also begin to develop a sense of what is unique about San Francisco's fabrication community. I have begun to understand local opportunities during the past few years, but I still have much to learn and am looking forward to you teaching me.

Students are not expected to have practice or construction experience for this class, although those who do will have an advantage. By the end of the semester, you should expect to have developed an understanding of the various ways that off-site fabrication fits within design and construction systems, from approaches that cheapen design to those that result in refined architectural output.

 

ARCH 270 [Castillo]

History of Modern Architecture 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar and one hour of dicussion per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Case Studies in Modern Architecture"

This survey of the “built discourses” of modern architecture reviews attempts to define modernity as a mode of design practice and a way of life. Through case studies of individual buildings, lectures examine developments in style, theory, graphic representation, construction technology and interior programming.

 

Arch 279.001 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Two to Four units
  • This section of Arch 279 is priortized for students enrolled in the Studio One program. Some seats may be available for interested graduate students on permission of the instructor

Extended Course Description.

"Architecture and Innovation" 

This course is required  for all students enrolled in the Studio One program. Some seats may be available for interested graduate students. Please contact the instructor for more information.

When we look at housing developments where identical single-family homes are repeated for miles, it is difficult to think of innovation as a key factor in architectural production. On the other hand, if we think of the work of most architects, innovation – driven by a mix of the architect’s ideas, use of new materials, technological advances, new production processes, and changes in their socio-economic context– is always sought after. Often, though, architectural innovation remains only as an idea on paper, or as one-of-the-kind product, even when intended to respond to a broader market.
The latter case is the topic of this seminar. The seminar is organized around case studies (selected and developed with the students) of architectural innovations that ‘failed’. The case studies should not be utopian proposals with no chance of being produced. Rather, they should be ideas, proposals, and actual buildings that while based on seemingly good ideas aimed to a broad market, remained “one-off”.

 

Arch 279.002 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Two to Four units
  • This section of Arch 279 meets the elective requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities

Extended Course Description.

"Utopias & Heterotopias"

his seminar is aimed at introducing two different ways of dealing with space. The first mode —utopian thought— has been around for long time and, at least since the “socialist utopians” of the industrial revolution, has been a key influence on urban design and planning. The first part of this course will focus on these attempts and on the influence that they still have on present days urban planning and design. Beginning with a discussion on the concept of utopia, the class will then look at the influence of utopian thought in several contemporary urban and planning case studies.
The second mode of thinking is suggested by the recent emergence of the concept of heterotopia. While utopias deal largely with physical space, this concept points at the existence of "other spaces" that coexist and overlap with the physical environment and create a multiple layering of spatial meanings, conflicts, and uses. Taking heterotopia as its starting point, in the second part of the seminar we'll discuss the characteristics of these social spaces and look for examples of it.

 

Arch 279.003 [Crawford]

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"California Architecture"

Many California architects came from other places: Maybeck from New York via the  Ecole Des Beaux Arts; Schindler and Neutra from Vienna; Frank Gehry from Chicago. But, once they arrived, their encounters with the Golden State produced new and original forms of architecture. This seminar will examine the qualities of the state’s environment, culture, economy, and population that have produced unique buildings and landscapes during the 20th century. We will look at both Northern and Southern California, starting with canonical designers then moving beyond them to consider lesser-known regional architects whose work embodies local characteristics. We will base our investigations on existing research but even more on direct experience of buildings and an understanding of their capacity to respond to regional considerations such as history, climate, landscape and culture. The course is organized around lectures, discussion of the readings and student presentations.

 

Arch 279.004 [Crawford]

Special Topics in Architectural History

  • Course format: three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Three units

Extended Course Description

"Americans on the Road 1950 - 1980"

During the period from 1950 to 1980, new highway programs, the spread of automobile ownership, economic growth, and more people on the move produced a uniquely American roadside landscape. Roadside strips appeared, lined with monumental signs and billboards, with buildings and parking lots designed to capture automobile traffic.  Cultural commentators from Lewis Mumford to first lady Ladybird Johnson were appalled by these chaotic landscapes, an attitude summed up by Peter Blake’s 1964 diatribe, God’s Own Junkyard. Well-known geographers analyzed “Visual Blight in America.” With a few exceptions such as the work of J.B. Jackson, such negative readings dominated until the 1972 appearance of Learning from Las Vegas by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott-Brown and Steven Izenour. They argued for a newly positive and analytical perspective on mobility and the commercial vernacular.  Replaced by limited-access Interstates, these roadside landscapes are now objects for retrospective nostalgia. 


This research seminar will explore the cultural, social, and spatial contexts and significance of these landscapes, focused around a series of documentary photographs of roads and roadside scenes taken by J.B. Jackson, David Lowenthal, Richard Longstreth and Chester Liebs from 1950 to 1970 and recently exhibited in Montpellier, France.  


After several introductory classes surveying the basic literature on the topic, ranging from Jackson, Blake and Venturi, Scott-Brown and Izenour to Vladimir Nabokov, students will select their own related research topic. Possible topics include novelistic and filmic representations, ‘New Topographic’ photography, mobility, tourism, architecture, etc. The information and interpretations students produce will become supplementary material for an exhibition based on the collection of photographs, to open in Spring, 2018.

 

Arch 281 [Crysler]

Methods of Inquiry in Architectural Research

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Four units

This is the introductory course in methods of inquiry in architecture research to be required of all entering Ph.D. students in all areas of the program. The purpose is to train students in predissertation and prethesis research strategies, expose them to variety of inquiry methods including the value of scholarly research, the nature of evidence, critical reading as content analysis and writing, presenting and illustrating scholarship in the various disciplines of architecture. 

Extended Course Description

This course situates case studies in architectural research in relation to major intellectual debates in the Anglo-American academic system since 1945. Weekly readings and discussions onnect specific approaches represented in our course texts to influential paradigms of research epistemology and practice in the humanities and social sciences on the Berkeley campus and beyond. As part of our effort to understand the relationship between architectural research and the wider context of intellectual debates, faculty and students will collaborate on the production of a temporal knowledge map, to be used as a resource in our seminar discussions and in student research projects. Both faculty and students will situate their research interests in relation to the map, connecting our respective scholarly positions to wider fields of debate in the department and on campus.
 
The course is team taught, with all six members of the HTS faculty resident in the Department in the Fall of 2017 taking part. Each faculty member leads a two-week module of the class. The modules are organized thematically, around faculty teaching and research interests, providing students with an introduction to the collective breadth and intellectual differences within our program. The first week of each module creates an intellectual context for the analysis of a major text in the second week. The readings employed to frame each of the major texts will also assist us in constructing bridges to our knowledge map of the Berkeley campus. In the process, students will gain an understanding of the richness and potential of campus debates, their histories and global connections. Weekly assignments (described in further detail below) will mix close readings of texts with attention to wider intellectual, social and historical issues.

 

ARCH 299 [Staff] 

Individual Study and Research for Master's and Doctoral Students  


ARCH 602 [Staff] 

Individual Study for Doctoral Students 

  • Course Format
  • Up to eight units