ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2016 Courses

Below are currently offered courses for the Fall semester. For course meeting times and locations, see the UC Berkeley Online Schedule of Classes.

Lower and Upper Division Courses

 

Arch 11A [Fields]

Introduction to Visual Representation and Drawing

Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.

Prerequisites: Env Des 1 with C- or better.

Description: (Formerly Env Des 11A) Introductory studio course: theories of representation and the use of several visual means, including freehand drawing and digital media, to analyze and convey ideas regarding the environment. Topics include contour, scale, perspective, color, tone, texture, and design.

 

Arch 39 [Ubbelohde]


Freshman & Sophomore Seminar

Course Format: One and a half hours of seminar per week.

Prerequisites: None

Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Extended Course Description

"Architecture Depends: A Deep Dive into the World of Being an Architect"

This seminar will read Jeremy Till's 2009 book "Architecture Depends." Till explores the condition of architecture being "a dependent discipline" (buffeted by external forces) while at the same architects do everything to resist that dependency.  In this easy-to-read and enjoyable text, the author covers much ground historically, theoretically and professionally, providing a valuable introduction to the discipline and the profession.  We will read a chapter each week for discussion. We will start with a brief visual introduction to the architects, buildings, books and cities that are included in the chapter, followed by discussion of the chapter the following week.  Example chapter titles are: A Semblance of Order, Coping with Contingency,Time of Waste, Slack Space, Lo-Fi Architecture, and Imperfect Ethics. Freshman and sophomores who have declared Architecture as a major or are thinking of it, as well as any students with any other major who are curious about the discipline or the profession.

Susan Ubbelohde is a Professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley where she teaches design studios and seminars on design theory, daylighting and high performance facades.  She is also serving as Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in the College of Environmental Design.  Susan is a founding partner of Loisos + Ubbelohde, an office of unconventional practice that brings research methods and physical and computer modeling to a wide range of architectural design solutions. The firm has pioneered new methods of energy conservation, production and analysis; lighting and daylighting design and analysis; natural ventilation analysis; design and fabrication of light emitting and controlling elements including light sculptures. The firm works closely with University researchers, LBNL and other research institutions. L+U projects have received numerous AIA awards for design and sustainability, AIA Top Ten Green project awards and LEED Platinum certifications.

Faculty web site: http://www.coolshadow.com

 

ARCH 98BC [Crysler] 

 

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. (F,SP)

 

ARCH100A [Iwamoto] 

Fundamentals of Architectural Design

  • Course Format: Two hours of lecture, six hours of studio, and two hours of computer graphics laboratory per week.
  • Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken in sequence.
  • Description: Introductory courses in the design of buildings. Problems emphasize conceptual strategies of form and space, site relationships and social, technological and environmental determinants.
  • 100A focuses on the conceptual design process.
  • 100B stresses tectonics, materials, and energy considerations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings and field trips. (F,SP)

 

ARCH 100C [Staff] 

Architectural Design III

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
  • Description: This is a studio course in architectural design. Students work on individual and group design projects that build on topics from Architecture 100B with additional integration of conditions pertinent to architectural production that may include architectural precedents, context, landscape and urban issues, envelope, performance, structure, and tectonics in the design of buildings.
  • There are five studio sections each with its own project.
  • Eligible students should enroll in Arch 100C, Sec 001 and participate in the lottery after the faculty studio presentations to determine which section to enroll.

 

ARCH 102A [Staff]  

Capstone Project Preparation Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
  • Prerequisites: Architecture 100A, Architecture 100B.
  • Description: This course is a course in architectural research methods with an emphasis on collaborative work. Students will work on individual facets of a collective topic of critical importance to the contemporary discipline of architecture within areas of faculty expertise. These include: architectural history and theory, structures, materials and methods of construction, building performance, energy and environment, and social factors and human behavior in architecture and the environment. The goal of Capstone Preparation is to develop a coherent research proposal that will be used as a topic for the Capstone Project course taken the following semester. 

Extended Course Description

Coming soon

 

Arch 109. 001 [Choksombatchai]

Special Topics in Architectural Design

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design

Extended Course Description

"Fabulously Furnished"

If we see learning as a lifelong pursuit, a workspace and a learning space may not be so different from a live and a play environment. What would this learning environment be?

This seminar/workshop is designed as part of a design research collaboration between The College of Environmental Design and Herman Miller, one of the most internationally renown furniture and manufactures companies. the premise of this partnership stems from an inquiries surrounding the drastic changes of the nature of workspace for the past 30 years and it is expected that our work environments will continue to change at a fast pace onward both at the level of physical health, and efficiency of production.

Room 170 and 172 Wurster will be selected as a case study for this research based on the real needs of the College to transform the spaces to serve our changing needs for multivalent uses for those rooms. Originally designed as typical classrooms, room 170 and 172 Wurster has since functioned as meeting rooms, design review spaces, exhibition spaces, active workspaces such as modeling, drawing, and painting, in addition to classrooms. As users of those spaces for the last decade, we witness the necessities for the re-design and re-program of the two rooms since they neither offer conducive work environments nor serve any specific function well.

It is an intention of the CED/Herman Miller partnership to implement a design proposal from the result of this seminar during the winter break. The research collaboration will continue into the Spring Semester with a post-occupancy evaluation after the course has ended.

The exploration will take into account these following inquiries :
> how does the future of design education change the classroom environment?
> What are the ranges of design pedagogy? and how do these two rooms facilitate different pedagogical structures?
> can we break away from a traditional classroom environment? and what will that be?

Students will have not only an opportunity to shape the design of their own learning space in Wurster, and see them built and implemented. But they will also be able to work closely with Herman Miller Research and Production team - one of the most renown, experienced high-end furniture manufactures, who has worked in collaboration with many architects and designers such as Charles and Ray Eames, Isamu Noguchi, George Nelson, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, and many others.

 

Arch 109. 002 [Pilloton]

Special Topics in Architectural Design

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design
  • Extended Course Description

Extended Course Description

"Design Frameworks"

Design Frameworks is a survey course that will introduce students to the definitions, theories, historical schools of thoughts, contemporary practices, and analysis of design and sustainability. Combining the lenses of Environment, Society, and Economy, the course will examine the ways in which designers and non-designers alike have defined the practice that we know as design today. The course begins with an open-ended question (“What is design?”) and asks students to think critically about the central tenets, commonalities, and limits of design in an ever-changing complex world. A historical and theoretical overview of predominant schools of thought across all scales of design (i.e. industrialization, modernism, post-modernism, and beyond) will ground the discussions to follow. Topics related to environmental sustainability including industrial ecologies, ecological design principles, lifecycle, biomimicry, LEED and accreditation systems, and closed-loop cycles will be presented. The course will also review the growing focus of social impact in design with specific attention given to Design Thinking, Human-Centered Design, environmental justice, and community-based design. Lastly, the course will survey a few key economic implications for design, including design and social entrepreneurship and design in emerging markets.

 

Arch 109. 003 [Chang]

Special Topics in Architectural Design

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design

Extended Course Description

"CRAFT: The Making of Buildings"

Traditionally, craft has been an important notion in architecture, or in any discipline that involves material, structure, and making. Today, much of the building construction may not be done by hand but hands are in presence in one way or another although often behind technology. A robotic arm that lays bricks may simulate literally the movement of a hand. In other words, while machinery may do the job for us, craft can help us to better understand contemporary technologies and imagine their outcome; besides, craft also offers a direct connection between human body and architecture, which enables us to comprehend space. In this class, we shall discuss the idea of architecture as craft by examining the buildings of a series of architects from different parts of the world, who worked and/or still work like craftspersons. Students are asked to analyze certain buildings using one of the oldest crafts of the profession – drawing. 

 

Arch 110AC [Cranz]

The Social and Cultural Basis of Design

  • Course Format: Four hours of lecture/forum per week.
  • Description: This course focuses on the significance of the physical environment for citizens and future design professionals. This course is an introduction to the field of human-environment studies, taught from an American Cultures perspective. Its objectives include: 1) being able to use the concepts in person-environment relations, 2) understanding how these concepts vary by subculture, primarily Anglo-, Hispanic-, and Chinese-American, 3) learning to use the methodological skills needed to conduct architectural programming and evaluation research, 4) thinking critically about the values embedded in design and the consequences for people, their behavior, and feelings.

 

ARCH 130 [Crysler]

Introduction to Architectural Design Theory and Criticism

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
  • Prerequisites: Open to upper division undergraduates.
  • Formerly 130A
  • Description: This class introduces students to the history and practice of design theory from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on developments of the last four decades. Readings and lectures explore specific constellations of theory and practice in relation to changing social and historical conditions. The course follows the rise of modernist design thinking, with particular emphasis on the growing influence of technical rationality across multiple fields in the post World War II period. Systematic approaches based in cybernetics and operations research (amongst others) are examined in the context of wider attempts to develop a science of design. Challenges to modernist design thinking, through advocacy planning and community-based design, the influence of social movements and countercultures, and parallel developments in postmodernism within and beyond architecture, provide the critical background for consideration of recent approaches to design theory, including those informed by developments in digital media and technology, environmental and ecological concerns, questions surrounding the globalization of architectural production, and the development of new materials.

Extended Course Description

Arch 130 provides an introduction to the ideas that have informed design thinking from the 19th century to the present, with an emphasis on the debates of the last four decades. The course explores significant changes in theory and practice across the design disciplines and professions (with particular emphasis on architecture), and considers how they are connected to larger social and historical forces. Students will be introduced to important tendencies in both critical reflection and design, and explore their interconnection through case studies of building, urban spaces and cities.

Readings and lectures situate debates about design theory at UC Berkeley in a broader national and international framework and explore the how past approaches continue to shape those that are influential today. Key issues extend from the role of industrialization in 19th century design thinking, through the rise of modernism and postmodernism, to recent issues surrounding digital technology, sustainability and globalization.

 

ARCH 139.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  

  • Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Units: 4
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  • Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm.
  • (F,SP)

Extended Description

"Spatial Politics and the Global City: Dispossession, Dissent and Design"

This course examines multiple forms of dispossession in cities of the global present. Contexts to be examined range from landscapes of foreclosure, bankruptcy and ecologies of risk to those of legal exception and graduated citizenship. Processes of dispossession will be traced into urban and architectural conditions and explored in relation to practices of dissent and spatial agency associated with the “new public art,” design activism, and recent debates around the "undercommons." Through urban case studies, the course will link the overlapping social, economic and political conditions of eviction, displacement and segregation produced by municipal debt, austerity urbanism, recent “superstorms” and other climate change events and their aftermath, to social and spatial responses, ranging from spontaneous urban interventions by artists and architects, and longer term strategies involving transformed models of production, economic exchange, governance and social space.

The course sequence includes an extended exploration of experimental forms of creative practice that connect dissent, design and landscapes of dispossession. Readings and lectures will draw upon recent texts linking across art, architecture, politics and aesthetics -- from Grant Kester’s investigations into collaborative art of the "one and the many" and Claire Bishop’s research on the “artificial hells” of participatory art, to Marcus Miessen’s reconsideration of design as critical spatial practice, Jose Estéban Munoz’s writing on the aesthetic practices of queer futurity, and innovative research on architecture, contingency and waste, by Jeremy Till, Stephen Cairns and Jane M. Jacobs. Case studies, though primarily based in the US, will emphasize the intrinsically transnational condition of cities and built environments, through readings and discussions that situate spatial practices in global networks of (dis)investment, knowledge and power. The final section of the class will examine the paradoxes of the public university in the neoliberal present, in relation to current debates around education for critical citizenship.

The course is intended as a laboratory for rethinking the relationship between theory and practice; a comparative inquiry into the role of space and creative agency in contemporary political dissent; and a context for speculation on the role of aesthetics and ethics in the global present.  Weekly discussions of readings will be crosscut with student-led presentations that link course texts to case studies of US cities at the forefront of current austerity measures.

 

Arch 142 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course Format:  1 hour Lecture / Seminar per week
  • This course must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis
  • 1 or 2 units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

ARCH 144 [Salter]  

Introduction to Acoustics

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: This course focuses on what architects need to know about acoustics. The first part deals with the fundamentals of acoustics including how sound levels are described and measured, and human response to sound. The course then covers building acoustics, mechanical equipment noise and vibration control, office acoustics, design of sound amplification systems, and environmental acoustics.

Extended Description

This is a five week "module" course. It will meet the first five weeks of the semester only.

 

ARCH 149. 001 [Schiavon] 

Special Topics in Building Science

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Prerequisite: Arch 140 or equivalent (See Instructor

Extended Course Description

"Building Energy Simulations"

Energy savings in buildings is among the most cost-effective and environmentally sustainable measures to reduce greenhouse gases emissions and energy consumption. 40% of the primary energy use and 74% of total U.S. electricity consumption is used in buildings.
For architects, building designers, engineers and sustainability consultants is important to use computer-based energy analysis tools for evidence-based design, sustainability ratings, energy codes compliance, building control and optimization, policy development and assessment. The central objective of this course is for students to develop a fundamental and practical knowledge about building performance and energy simulations.  By the end of the semester you will be able to specify, design, run, analyze, compare and assess building energy simulations.  
The central focus will be a semester-long project in which you will model and test a building of your interest. Topics will include solar and urban climate analysis, thermal comfort, natural ventilation, thermal flows, energy use, building envelope, passive heating and cooling strategies, advanced mechanical systems. Student will learn to use climate analysis (Climate Consultant 5.4) and building performance (a GUI to US DOE EnergyPlus simulation engine) software

 

ARCH 149. 002 [Brager] 

Special Topics in Building Science

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Prerequiste: Arch 140 or Equivalent (See Instructor)

Extended Course Description

"Natural Cooling: Sustainable Design for a Warming Planet"

Climate-responsive buildings not only minimize the use of energy and its associated ecological impacts, and also allow people to have a greater degree of interaction with their environment.  This person-centered design approach can create comfort and delight within the indoor environment, and be healthier, more connected to place and nature, and more sustainable than sealed structures that rely almost completely on mechanical systems.  This role of experiential aesthetics will be an important focus of the class. The course covers building design and operational strategies that include low- and high-tech solutions, dynamic high performance facades, natural ventilation, and a range of other innovative, integrated cooling strategies.  We will be paying particular attention to understanding mixed mode buildings that combine mechanical and natural cooling.  Throughout the course we will use interactive and experiential exercises, simulation tools, case studies, and design exercises for exploring these questions.  Students will also use the Building Science Wind Tunnel to test design solutions for natural ventilation.

 

ARCH 150 [Black] 

Introduction to Structures  

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and thirty hours of discussion per semester.
  • Prerequisites: Physics 8A.
  • Description: Study of forces, materials, and structural significance in the design of buildings. Emphasis on understanding the structural behavior of real building systems.

 

ARCH 170A [Shanken] 

An Historical Survey of Architecture and Urbanism

  • Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and 15 hours of seminar/discussion per semester.
  • Description: The first part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval periods; the second part studies the period since 1400; the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their social and historical context.

Extended course description

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the history of the built environment from its beginnings to about 1500CE. The scope is broad in geographical, cultural, and architectural terms, combining architectural and urban history with anthropology, and geography. It is also an introduction to historical methods in architectural history. Students will learn a variety of ways to look at the history of buildings and cities while they learn both canonical monuments and less celebrated examples. Although the prime emphasis is on the Mediterranean basin, a substantial number of lectures will be devoted to architecture in Asia, Africa, and Meso-America. Students interested in history, art history, anthropology, archaeology, architecture, sociology, planning, material culture, cities, and urbanism will find it an excellent introduction to the subject, as well as to the humanities in general. Students from all departments and at all levels are welcome! Satisfies the general breadth requirement for Historical Studies and Arts and Literature..

 

ARCH 198BC [Crysler]

Berkeley Connect

  • Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
  • Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.

 

Graduate Level Classes

ARCH 200A [Staff] 

Introduction to Architecture Studio 1

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
  • Description: Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.

 

ARCH 200C [Staff]

Representational Practice in Architectural Design 

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
  • Credit option: 200C must be taken in conjunction with 200A.
  • Description: This course will address three distinct levels of representational practice in architectural design: 1) cultivate an understanding of the foundational discourse and diversity of approaches to architectural representation; 2) develop a fluency in the canonical methods found in architectural practice; 3) encourage the development of a personal relationship to forms of modeling and formats of drawing.


ARCH 201 [Staff]

Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio 

  • Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
  • Prerequisites: 100A-100B or 200A-200B.
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Description: The design of buildings or communities of advanced complexity. Each section deals with a specific topic such as housing, public and institutional buildings, and local or international community development. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.

 

Arch 203 [Staff ]

Integrated Design Studio

  • Course format: Eight hours of studio per week
  • Description: the penultimate studio where students incorporate their accumulated knowledge into architectural solutions.


ARCH 204A [Staff] 

Thesis Seminar

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
  • Description: Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.

 

ARCH 205A [Schleicher] 

Studio One, Fall 

  • Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
  • Prerequisites: Consent of Chair or graduate advisors during fall semester.
  • Formerly 205
  • Description: This course is a one-year, post-professional design studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.

Extended Course Description

Coming soon


ARCH 207A [Pakravan] 

Architecture Lectures Colloquium

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
  • Description: This course accompanies the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the first in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. Students will attend all Wednesday evening lectures of the College of Environmental Design lecture series. Every third week, they will meet with the instructor for a one-hour discussion.

 

ARCH 207C [Creedon] 

Professional Practice Colloquium  

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
  • Description: This course accompanies the required comprehensive design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the third in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program.

 

Arch 209. 001 [Calott]

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design

Extended Course Description

"Integrated Development, Architecture & Urbanism"

This course is a Primer interrogating the myriad development forces which produce our streets, neighborhoods, towns, cities and regions, as well as our global slums and blighted urban landscapes. Aspiring to empower design and planning professionals with greater agency to participate in the creation of urban places, the class will develop a critical understanding of development practices and their impact on social, economic and urban form.  Sought through a broad understanding of fundamental real estate development processes and enterprises, students will be challenged to explore how the benefits of their design and planning expertise might be extended to more people, mitigate systemic urban problems, and to more effectively impact what type of urban environments we make.  Seminar topics will attempt to demystify real estate development explored through a review of selected Case Studies and weekly lectures by the Instructor and invited design, planning and development industry professionals.  This course will investigate how Development, Architecture and Urbanism are intertwined, contending that cities are our most sustainable resource, holding the key to our social, economic, and culturally equitable future, as well as our planet’s environmental stewardship.

This course will promote an interdisciplinary approach for design professionals and policy makers who collaborate together in the development of cities, designed to include Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, City & Regional Planning, and Law and Business graduate students.

 

Arch 209. 002 [Choksombatchai]

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design

Extended Course Description

"Fabulously Furnished"

If we see learning as a lifelong pursuit, a workspace and a learning space may not be so different from a live and a play environment. What would this learning environment be?

This seminar/workshop is designed as part of a design research collaboration between The College of Environmental Design and Herman Miller, one of the most internationally renown furniture and manufactures companies. the premise of this partnership stems from an inquiries surrounding the drastic changes of the nature of workspace for the past 30 years and it is expected that our work environments will continue to change at a fast pace onward both at the level of physical health, and efficiency of production.

Room 170 and 172 Wurster will be selected as a case study for this research based on the real needs of the College to transform the spaces to serve our changing needs for multivalent uses for those rooms. Originally designed as typical classrooms, room 170 and 172 Wurster has since functioned as meeting rooms, design review spaces, exhibition spaces, active workspaces such as modeling, drawing, and painting, in addition to classrooms. As users of those spaces for the last decade, we witness the necessities for the re-design and re-program of the two rooms since they neither offer conducive work environments nor serve any specific function well.

It is an intention of the CED/Herman Miller partnership to implement a design proposal from the result of this seminar during the winter break. The research collaboration will continue into the Spring Semester with a post-occupancy evaluation after the course has ended.

The exploration will take into account these following inquiries :
> how does the future of design education change the classroom environment?
> What are the ranges of design pedagogy? and how do these two rooms facilitate different pedagogical structures?
> can we break away from a traditional classroom environment? and what will that be?

Students will have not only an opportunity to shape the design of their own learning space in Wurster, and see them built and implemented. But they will also be able to work closely with Herman Miller Research and Production team - one of the most renown, experienced high-end furniture manufactures, who has worked in collaboration with many architects and designers such as Charles and Ray Eames, Isamu Noguchi, George Nelson, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, and many others.

 

Arch 209.003 [Chang]

Special Topics in Architectural Design

  • Course Format: One hour of lecture / seminar per unit, per week
  • Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher
  • Description: Special topics in architectural design

Extended Course Description

"CRAFT: The Making of Buildings"

Traditionally, craft has been an important notion in architecture, or in any discipline that involves material, structure, and making. Today, much of the building construction may not be done by hand but hands are in presence in one way or another although often behind technology. A robotic arm that lays bricks may simulate literally the movement of a hand. In other words, while machinery may do the job for us, craft can help us to better understand contemporary technologies and imagine their outcome; besides, craft also offers a direct connection between human body and architecture, which enables us to comprehend space. In this class, we shall discuss the idea of architecture as craft by examining the buildings of a series of architects from different parts of the world, who worked and/or still work like craftspersons. Students are asked to analyze certain buildings using one of the oldest crafts of the profession – drawing. 

 

Arch 216 [Cranz]

The Sociology of Taste in Environmental Design

  • course format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Grading option: Letter grade or Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory
  • Description: Taste is at work in the way we display our things as much as in the qualities of things themselves. A performance-oriented model of taste observes that objects fall into two broad categories: pragmatic (that support behavior) and symbolic (that identify a person). People visually organize these two categories of objects using both explicit and subconscious aesthetic rules to produce visually unified displays. Depending on how it is used, how it is placed in relation to other things, an object's meaning can vary. The display of taste is where objects take on--and shed--meanings, depending on how they are combined with one another. This seminar reviews the extensive body of 20th-century theory and empirical research on taste and considers the implications of theories about taste for design creation, design education, and for client-professional relations.

Extended Course Description

This seminar explores taste as a communication process. Communication takes place not only through words, but also through paralinguistic sounds, gestures, proxemic maneuvers, touch, smell, and the display of material artifacts. The material world –including architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and planning--is recruited into a shared system of meanings that allows us to communicate non-verbally to one another about a whole host of things. The things we choose and the way we arrange them are part of "larger, ongoing processes of expression and exchange” (Musello, 1992). Objects, artwork, buildings, and even landscapes, like other pieces of material culture, are "multivocal and polysemic media.” Depending on how they are used, how they are placed in relation to other things, objects can have different meanings.  Accordingly, taste is at work in the way we display our things, not only in the qualities of things themselves.  Their placement is one way that objects take on--and shed—meanings, depending on how they are combined with one another.  Through display people assemble and reassemble their identity as individuals and as groups. We compose objects in space in order to produce an effect, either in ourselves or in others.

Rather than parse good versus bad taste, we will examine taste as communication through the material world. This model articulates how that communication takes place: we harmonize “pragmatic” and “symbolic” objects, using aesthetic principles.   We will explore what this theory means for designers, architectures, landscape architects, urban planners, and for design education. 

 

Arch 238 [Ubbelohde]

The dialectic of Poetics & Technology

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week
  • Grading Option: Letter Grade
  • Description: This seminar examines the relationship between technology and design philosophy in the work of architects through analysis of individual buildings within the cntext of the complete oeuvre and an examination of the architect's writings and lectures. The seminar poses the following questions: What is the role of technology in the design philosophy of the architect and how is this theoretical position established in the architect's writings, lectures, interviews? How is this position revealed through the work moves to the developing world? How is this position negotiated in the design and construction of an individual building? Is this a successful strategy for achieving technical performance? Is this a successful strategy for achieving a coherent theoretical statement? A series of lectures explores these questions in relation to the architect and a set of required readings introduces the work of the architect and explores the relationship between technology and design philosophy. Students choose one building to investigate in parallel with the methods and issues discussed in class. These studies are presented in class as completed and assembled for submission as a final project.

Extended Course Description

"The Work of Le Corbusier"

Fall 2016 this seminar will examine the relationship between technology and design philosophy in the work of Le Corbusier, an architect whose work remains a touchstone for contemporary practice and theory. In his design work, Le Corbusier addressed issues of social equity, public health, and mass production of housing along with the need for fresh air, sunshine, vegetation and climatically responsive design. Issues of proportion, composition, and symbolism as well as structure, material, client desires and  costs were also part of the mix.  

Our inquiry will proceed with analysis of individual buildings within the context of the complete oeuvre  and the architect’s writings, lectures, films and paintings. The seminar investigates the following questions:
•  What is the role of technology in the design philosophy of Le Corbusier?
•  How is this theoretical position established by the Le Corbusier's writings, lectures, interviews, films, paintings, etc?
•  Does this position change when the work moves to the developing world?    
•  How is this position negotiated in the design and construction of an individual building?
•  Is this a successful strategy for achieving technical performance?
•  Is this a successful strategy for achieving a  coherent theoretical statement?

I will provide a series of lectures exploring these questions in relation to Le Corbusier's work.  Assignments will explore these themes through the analysis of a single building.  The seminar includes a carefully curated set of required readings by Le Corbusier and various scholars that explore the issues under examination.

This is a Graduate Seminar and graduates have priority for enrolling in the course.  Undergraduates are welcome if there is room and they have completed Arch100B and Arch 140.

 

ARCH 239.001 [Crysler] 

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  

  • Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Units: 4
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  • Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm.
  • (F,SP)

Extended Description

"Spatial Politics and the Global City: Dispossession, Dissent and Design"

This course examines multiple forms of dispossession in cities of the global present. Contexts to be examined range from landscapes of foreclosure, bankruptcy and ecologies of risk to those of legal exception and graduated citizenship. Processes of dispossession will be traced into urban and architectural conditions and explored in relation to practices of dissent and spatial agency associated with the “new public art,” design activism, and recent debates around the "undercommons." Through urban case studies, the course will link the overlapping social, economic and political conditions of eviction, displacement and segregation produced by municipal debt, austerity urbanism, recent “superstorms” and other climate change events and their aftermath, to social and spatial responses, ranging from spontaneous urban interventions by artists and architects, and longer term strategies involving transformed models of production, economic exchange, governance and social space.

The course sequence includes an extended exploration of experimental forms of creative practice that connect dissent, design and landscapes of dispossession. Readings and lectures will draw upon recent texts linking across art, architecture, politics and aesthetics -- from Grant Kester’s investigations into collaborative art of the "one and the many" and Claire Bishop’s research on the “artificial hells” of participatory art, to Marcus Miessen’s reconsideration of design as critical spatial practice, Jose Estéban Munoz’s writing on the aesthetic practices of queer futurity, and innovative research on architecture, contingency and waste, by Jeremy Till, Stephen Cairns and Jane M. Jacobs. Case studies, though primarily based in the US, will emphasize the intrinsically transnational condition of cities and built environments, through readings and discussions that situate spatial practices in global networks of (dis)investment, knowledge and power. The final section of the class will examine the paradoxes of the public university in the neoliberal present, in relation to current debates around education for critical citizenship.

The course is intended as a laboratory for rethinking the relationship between theory and practice; a comparative inquiry into the role of space and creative agency in contemporary political dissent; and a context for speculation on the role of aesthetics and ethics in the global present.  Weekly discussions of readings will be crosscut with student-led presentations that link course texts to case studies of US cities at the forefront of current austerity measures.

 

ARCH 239.002 [Cenzatti] 

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  

  •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
  •   (F,SP)

Extended Course Description

"Public Spaces"

At first sight public space may seem an innocuous subject. Public spaces are places that are, or should be, accessible to everybody and where social encounters and public activities could take place. As the debates among social scientists, political theorists, planners, and architects over the last 30 years have shown, though, what public means and who the public is have become difficult questions, rather than certainties:

  • What is the object of ‘public-ness’? Is it the encounter with strangers on the street, or is it the arena of a community’s shared concerns? And who is the public? Can the public include everybody, or unavoidably public-ness is restrictive and implies discrimination?
  •  Does a space have to be publicly owned to be public? To what extent is a shopping mall, or a café, a public space? And when is a sidewalk, or a bridge, a significant public space?
  •  Is the internet a (virtual) space? If so, to what extent are social networks public spaces?

In this seminar we will explore these questions through theoretical readings, case studies and through our own observations. Students (individually or in very small groups) will be asked to fulfill two assignments. The first will focus on addressing a theoretical question and case study from published essays. The second will require the development of case studies by the students.

 

ARCH 239.003 [Liebermann] 

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  

  •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
  •   (F,SP)

Extended Description

"Design & Difference: Critical Non-Compliance"

Critical Non-Compliance is a seminar-workshop that calls on students to consider how design can engage with disability to generate new design methodologies, formal innovation, and spatial experience. Through an analysis of built environments, interdisciplinary readings, and presentations by people with first-hand experience of moving through the world in non-standard bodies, students will be develop a critical stance about how the design of buildings and objects shape the meaning of embodied experience and subjectivity.  

Consideration of a social, sentient, and situated body is rarely brought to the forefront of conscious attention in design practices. Focusing on the disabled body, instead of ideals and averages, provides imaginative access to specificities of embodiment, movement, sensory experience, as well as identity. This aligns with the recent focus on the body as a site of scholarly and political interest, challenging the concept of a “universal body.”

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is important civil rights legislation that has granted protections and opportunities to millions of Americans. At the same time, the technical rationality of the ADA design guidelines has drawn criticism for stifling creativity by enforcing another set of standards—access standards. Critical Non-Compliance calls for a form of architectural activism, responding to the coercive idea of compliance with creative disobedience. The purpose is not to replace existing top-down approaches like the ADA design guidelines but to develop bottom-up approaches alongside them. Students will explore an alternative course to both ADA compliance and Universal Design, which flattens disability experience as one among many functional problems to be resolved through design. Approaches to design that proclaim anatomical differences rather than normalizing them moves architecture away from its historical engagement with an abstract and standard body.

The course is organized around a series of short design conceptualization projects. Going beyond the technical minimums of compliance with access laws, students will collaborate to develop architectural scenarios exploring radically specific embodiment. The aim of these interventions is to move design responses to disability beyond the functionality of ramps and toilet grab bars to the sensory, ceremonial, and celebratory possibilities of more and different kinds of difference. By innovating and experimenting with the material and semiotic potential of disability, disability becomes an incentive for new ways of thinking about the body in relationship to design.

Please note that the course number for this section may change to Env Des 207 at the start of the semester pending COCI review.

 

ARCH 239.004 [Turan] 

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  

  •   Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  •   Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  •   Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
  •   (F,SP)

Extended Description

"Measure for the Anthropocene"

This course starts with the following question: What can architecture possibly contribute toward global climate change? And, it elaborates on the disciplinary and cultural potentials of the following provocation: Rather than limiting the role of climate change for design to an external reality to master or solve, might we see it as an opportunity to prompt a renewed understanding of realism for architecture? Inherent in the premise of the seminar is the investigation of a new conception of architecture’s engagement with the wider world through a specific focus on design’s capacity to impact planetary imagination by recasting the role of architecture.

Organized around particular themes and case studies, the seminar aims to identify new directions for critical thinking and speculative work in contemporary architecture.

 

Arch 242 [Brager]

Sustainability Colloquium

  • Course Format:  1 hour Lecture / Seminar per week
  • This course must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis
  • 1 or 2 units

Extended Description

Presentations by leaders in the Bay Area professional community on a variety of topics related to green buildings, offering perspectives from the fields of architecture, engineering, consulting, urbanism, and research.  We have a stellar line-up of dynamic speakers who have been keynote speakers at a variety of venues - it’s as if we’re bringing the conference to you!  So why not end the week with a bit of decompression, enjoy some insights some of the leading professionals in our industry.  The class can be taken for variable units.  For 1 unit, there is required weekly attendance, reading, and one end-of-semester written assignment (details will be on the bSpace site).  For 2 units, there will be additional writing assignments. A bSpace site will be available as the semester approaches - look there for the Schedule of Speakers (under Syllabus), and for more information about the writing assignments for 2 units (under Assignments).

 

Arch 243 [Brager]

Natural Cooling: Sustainable Design for a Warming Planet

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture / seminar per week
  • Prerequisite: Arch 140 or equivalent (see instructor)

Extended Course Description

Climate-responsive buildings not only minimize the use of energy and its associated ecological impacts, and also allow people to have a greater degree of interaction with their environment.  This person-centered design approach can create comfort and delight within the indoor environment, and be healthier, more connected to place and nature, and more sustainable than sealed structures that rely almost completely on mechanical systems.  This role of experiential aesthetics will be an important focus of the class. The course covers building design and operational strategies that include low- and high-tech solutions, dynamic high performance facades, natural ventilation, and a range of other innovative, integrated cooling strategies.  We will be paying particular attention to understanding mixed mode buildings that combine mechanical and natural cooling.  Throughout the course we will use interactive and experiential exercises, simulation tools, case studies, and design exercises for exploring these questions.  Students will also use the Building Science Wind Tunnel to test design solutions for natural ventilation.

 

Arch 249, 001 [Schiavon]

Special Topics In Building Sciences

  • Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week per semester

Extended Course Description

"Building Energy Simulations"

Prerequisites: Building Science fundamentals (e.g. Arch 140 or equivalent) or consent of instructor.

Energy savings in buildings is among the most cost-effective and environmentally sustainable measures to reduce greenhouse gases emissions and energy consumption. 40% of the primary energy use and 74% of total U.S. electricity consumption is used in buildings.
For architects, building designers, engineers and sustainability consultants is important to use computer-based energy analysis tools for evidence-based design, sustainability ratings, energy codes compliance, building control and optimization, policy development and assessment. The central objective of this course is for students to develop a fundamental and practical knowledge about building performance and energy simulations.  By the end of the semester you will be able to specify, design, run, analyze, compare and assess building energy simulations.  
The central focus will be a semester-long project in which you will model and test a building of your interest. Topics will include solar and urban climate analysis, thermal comfort, natural ventilation, thermal flows, energy use, building envelope, passive heating and cooling strategies, advanced mechanical systems. Student will learn to use climate analysis (Climate Consultant 5.4) and building performance (a GUI to US DOE EnergyPlus simulation engine) software

 

ARCH 249, 002 [Salter]

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings  

  • Course Format: Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  • Prerequisites: 140
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  • Description:

Extended Course Description

"Introduction to Acoustics"

This is a five week module class meeting the first five weeks of the semester.

 

Arch 259 [Schleicher]

SPECIAL TOPICS IN STRUCTURAL DESIGN

  •  Course Format: 1 hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
  •  Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  •  Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  •  Description: Topics include a general introduction to bending and folding principles in nature and technology, case studies of bent and folded structures from varies fields of application, hands-on physical experimentation and digital simulation of flexible and elastic structures and mechanism, an  introduction to the design of patterns and tessellations, and a screening for architectural implementations of compliant systems.

Extended Course Description

"Form-Finding & Panelization II "

This follow-up class will continue the explorations of form-finding and panelization strategies for gridshell structures in architecture. Building up on the findings of the previous course, this class will look once again into physical and digital modeling techniques yet this time with a greater focus on the relationship between structural form and forces, basic shell behavior, and the evolution of form-finding and optimization strategies.

 With the increasing availability of fast and interactive design and simulation tools, we can investigate the interplay of boundary conditions, external loads, geometrical form, and internal forces and gain a better understanding how shell structures transfer loads to their supports. In this structural system, the predominant loading is typically the dead load resulting from the structure’s self-weight. The transfer of loads happens through forces acting in the plane of the shell, which are referred to as membrane stresses and usually are compressive, or a combination of compressive and tensile stresses. Shell structures can be constructed as a continuous surface or in the case of gridshells and lattice structures from discrete elements that follow that surface.

 What makes the design of lightweight shell structures particularly difficult is the fact that they need to be sufficiently thick to carry these compressive stresses without buckling. In addition, the exact geometry of a high-performing shell is often not known in the beginning but instead has to be ascertained by implementing a form-finding process. The major challenge of these constructions, however, lies in their detailing, rationalization, and fabrication. Therefore, the second emphasis of this class will expand the area of form-finding simulations and integrate the determination of cutting patterns and panelization strategies, as needed for example for steel gridshells with a glass cladding.

 This class requires prior knowledge in digital modeling with Rhinoceros 5 and Grasshopper. While being a follow-up class, this course is also open for new enrollment of students who haven’t taken the previous course.

.

ARCH 260 [Buntrock]

Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level  

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
  • Description: This course addresses the methods and materials of construction. While students will not be experts at the end of the semester, the course should give students the confidence to feel comfortable on a construction site or when designing a small building for a studio. The course will focus on four major territories: structural materials, building envelope, built elements such as stairs and cabinets, and costs, labor conditions, conventional practices, and the regulatory environments that control design.

 

ARCH 262 [Davids]

Architecture In Detail

  • Course Format: Three hours of Lecture / Seminar per week
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor 
  • Description: This seminar will reevaluate the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture.

Extended Course Description


This seminar will re-evaluate of the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture. Nowhere in architecture is bodily contact felt more readily than in realm of detail. Small when compared to a building’s overall mass, details should be considered the building’s basic genetic in-print determining not just the architecture’s appearance but also its performance. Each detail contributes to the meaning of the whole and simultaneously represents a microcosm of
the larger entity. Le Corbusier traced back this idea back to nature where the smallest cell determines the validity of the whole.

Through invited lecturers, reading, dedicated research, analysis, and interpretation of case studies and detail design investigation the course will explore and understand formal/ material innovation and the increasingly global nature of architectural practice; consultants, suppliers, and fabricators as well as the critical role of digital technology in construction. We will also discuss the ethical dimension of detailing as the choice of materials and their combination has a potential impact on world resources, environments, and economy.

The design of a detail either of your general interest, related to one of your projects or a currently project under development will be the main goal of the seminar. As micro design/built projects, detail design can provide a comprehensive view of the design process. While small-scale, students gain hands-on experience with design, material characteristics, construction, and even potentially budgeting. The small size of these projects allows for students to realize a final product while honing the skills needed to build a more complex structure. In doing so, students gain concrete experience at every stage of the design detail /build process, which can then be applied to other types of building projects

Course Structure
The course is structured in three parts:
1) Weekly readings aimed at understanding approaches to detailing, and exploring the historical, cultural and
technological context of Modern architectural construction;
2) A series of lectures by Bay Area practitioners focused on detailing work in one or two buildings of their practices
3) An in depth case-study of significant buildings leading to the design and the making of one 1: 1 detail (or smaller
depending on the detail) intended to develop and advance your own design work.

 

ARCH 270 [Castillo]

History of Modern Architecture 

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
  • Description: This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or sometimes two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, critical building details, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other parallel works and the architect's overall body of work.

Extended Course Description

"Case Studies in Modern Architecture"

This survey of the “built discourses” of modern architecture reviews attempts to define modernity as a mode of design practice and a way of life. Through case studies of individual buildings, lectures examine developments in style, theory, graphic representation, construction technology and interior programming.

 

Arch 279. 001 [Shanken]

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
  • Selected topics in the history of architecture.
  • Three or four units.

Extended Course Description

"Memory in Contemporary Thought"

In this course we will read key works in the interdisciplinary and Phoenix-like field of memory studies. Readings will explore the bundle of ideas surrounding patrimony, heritage, tradition, trauma, nostalgia, destruction, erasure, forensics, forgetting and historical amnesia, preservation and conservation, vernacular forms of remembrance, memorials, counter-memorials, temporality, and what might be called the "guilt environment." Readings may include Pierre Nora, Mieke Bal, Françoise Choay, Reinhard Koselleck, Alison Landsberg, David Lowenthal, Kirk Savage, James E. Young, and others. While the course is set up as a reading course for 3 credits, students wishing to write a paper may do so for an additional credit.

 

Arch 279.002 [Cenzatti]

  • Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
  • Selected topics in the history of architecture.
  • Three units.

Extended Course Description

"A question in a new spirit: I am forty years old, why not buy myself a house: for I need this tool. A house like the Ford I bought (or a Citroën, if I’m a dandy)."    Le Corbusier, Towards an Architecture, 1923

"In the future the individual will be able to order from the warehouse the housing that is right for him."  Walter Gropius, Whonhous-Industrie,1923

"Probably no other operation demonstrated as conclusively [as William Levitt’s suburbs] that adapting assembly-line methods to the building site was  more cost- effective than factory prefabrication for single-family houses." Richard Longstreth, 2010

Le Corbusier‘s wish and Gropius’ prediction did not quite come true. Today, houses that can can delivered to “the individual’s” lot (if not picked up from a warehouse) make up only 6.4% of the US housing sector (US Census, 2013). The third statement, on the other hand, shows how by the late 1940s the same technological innovations of mass production that inspired Le Corbusier and Gropius had become, at the hand of developers such as Mr. Levitt, extremely successful in meeting the post-war housing demand. Taken together, the three statements are examples of the enduring interest of architecture with innovation, from the use of new materials to new technologies and systems of production. At the same time, an important difference between the two architects and the developer rests on the different social and economic context in which statements and housing developments occurred – few years before the Great Depression the former, and at the beginning of "mass society” at the end of WW2, the latter.

With particular emphasis on the topic of standardization, productive systems, and consumer markets, this seminar, assuming that failure can teach as much as (if not more than) success, focuses on innovations in architecture whose outcome was not particularly successful in giving new directions to architectural discourses and production. To this end, the seminar is organized around the development of case studies analyzed according to interplay between three factors: (1) The architectural ‘philosophy’ of the architect introducing the innovation; (2) the source and development (in other industries) of the innovation in question; (3) the social and economic context in which both architect and innovation were located.

 

ARCH 298, 002 [Schiavon] 

Special Group Study

  •   Course Format:
  •   Credit option: May be repeated for credit up to unit limitation.
  •   Grading option: Sections 1-3 to be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Sections 4-10 to be graded on a letter grade basis.
  •   Description: Special group studies on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.

Extended Course Description

"Faculty Research Colloquium"

One hour and half of seminar per week. Prerequisite: None
This research colloquium course has the objective to expose students to the research interests of the architectural faculty, with a particular focus on the ones involved in advising MS and PhD students. The class is shaped around the presentations and the discussions with the guest speakers. The list of potentials presenters for this semester can be found under Syllabus. The main areas that will be covered are: architecture, building science, design, history, society, sustainability, technology, theory. The class is open to MArch students as a 1-unit class and to the MS/PhD students as a 2-unit class. Speakers will give an article to read before class and MS/PhD students will need to write 3-5 questions and opinion statements (~300-500 words) based on the article one week before the lecture with the objective of stimulating the discussion after the presentation. Speakers will cover, for roughly an hour, their research objectiveS, framework and methods, they will also briefly describe their career trajectory and experiences in academia. Half an hour will be dedicated to discussion. During the semester other MS/PhD students in the program who are close to the completion of their degree will present their research and will give advices on how to successfully pass through the program. During one of the classes, the Graduate Office Manager and the Head Graduate Advisor will give overview of the program requirements, and be available to answer questions.


ARCH 299 [Staff] 

Individual Study and Research for Master's and Doctoral Students  

  •   Course Format:
  •   Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  •   Description: Individual studies including reading and individual research under the supervision of a faculty adviser and designed to reinforce the student's background in areas related to the proposed degree.
     


ARCH 602 [Staff] 

Individual Study for Doctoral Students 

  • Course Format:
  • Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
  • Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
  • Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. This course may not be used for units or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.